Present-day water-supply systems use a network of high-pressure pumps, and pipes in buildings are now made of copper,[25] brass, plastic (particularly cross-linked polyethylene called PEX, which is estimated to be used in 60% of single-family homes[26]), or other nontoxic material. Due to its toxicity, most cities moved away from lead water-supply piping by the 1920s in the United States,[27] although lead pipes were approved by national plumbing codes into the 1980s,[28] and lead was used in plumbing solder for drinking water until it was banned in 1986.[27] Drain and vent lines are made of plastic, steel, cast-iron, or lead.[29][30]
Galvanized steel potable water supply and distribution pipes are commonly found with nominal pipe sizes from 3⁄8 inch (9.5 mm) to 2 inches (51 mm). It is rarely used today for new construction residential plumbing. Steel pipe has National Pipe Thread (NPT) standard tapered male threads, which connect with female tapered threads on elbows, tees, couplers, valves, and other fittings. Galvanized steel (often known simply as "galv" or "iron" in the plumbing trade) is relatively expensive, and difficult to work with due to weight and requirement of a pipe threader. It remains in common use for repair of existing "galv" systems and to satisfy building code non-combustibility requirements typically found in hotels, apartment buildings and other commercial applications. It is also extremely durable and resistant to mechanical abuse. Black lacquered steel pipe is the most widely used pipe material for fire sprinklers and natural gas.

The Home Depot has a wide selection of high-quality plumbing parts including sump pumps, water heaters, HVAC systems, pipes and much more. The Home Depot even has eco-friendly plumbing options to help you save money and live green. If you need professional advice or installation assistance with any of your plumbing projects, turn to The Home Depot to help you finish your plumbing project. 
Plumbers, pipefitters, and steamfitters may use many different materials and construction techniques, depending on the type of project. Residential water systems, for example, use copper, steel, and plastic pipe that one or two plumbers can install. Power plant water systems, by contrast, are made of large steel pipes that usually take a crew of pipefitters to install. Some workers install stainless steel pipes on dairy farms and in factories, mainly to prevent contamination.
As a heating service company we keep up to date with the latest technical aspects of hot water tanks, boiler service, tankless water heaters and all things related to home heating. If you have a problem with radiant heating, forced air furnace or electric heat you can count on us. We specialize in repair and maintenance services on all furnace brands. Installation is another aspect of our business, whether commercial or residential, for new construction, renovations or replacement due to age or failure.
Don’t fix it if it’s not broken, right? While the saying makes sense, when it comes to plumbing, it’s best to simply keep an eye on things. This means not overlooking toilets, sink drains, pipes and valves. And, it’s a good idea to schedule an annual maintenance appointment with your plumber, so you don’t have to pay a ton of money later! Got a leak? Here’s how to fix a water-shutoff valve that’s leaking.

plumbing, piping systems inside buildings for water supply and sewage. The Romans had a highly developed plumbing system; water was brought to Rome by aqueducts and distributed to homes in lead pipes—hence the name plumbing from the Latin word plumbum for lead. During the Middle Ages, however, plumbing became almost nonexistent. In fact, London's first water system after the Middle Ages (c.1515) consisted partly of the rehabilitated Roman system; the rest was patterned after it. Modern plumbing began in the early 1800s, when steam engines became capable of supplying water under pressure and cheap cast iron pipes could be supplied to carry it. The common materials used today in water supply pipes are steel, copper, brass, plastic, and lead. Plumbing for sewage is made of cast iron, steel, asbestos cement, copper, and plastic. Water pressure is usually insufficient to supply the needs of tall apartment and office buildings; in such cases storage tanks are installed on the roof, into which a pump lifts water. The water then flows through the piping system of the building by gravity. Smaller buildings may have a pneumatic tank for the same purpose. The tank is partly filled with air, which is compressed when water is pumped in so that it will force water through the pipes. Sewage and drain systems typically have a trap, often a loop-shaped section of pipe, to seal off vapors in the pipes from the rest of the building. Vent pipes lead these vapors to the outside of the building; they also eliminate any suction in the piping and thus prevent the siphoning of water from traps when a nearby fixture discharges. In the 1970s and 80s flexible polybutylene plumbing was widely installed in standard and mobile homes. When unprecedented numbers of these plastic pipes began leaking because of exposure to chlorine and other chemicals in tap water, homeowners brought class-action lawsuits against the manufacturers, which were settled in 1995 for hundreds of millions of dollars.
Master plumber: To become a master plumber, a person must have a certain number of years' experience as a journeyman plumber, in addition to an associate's degree or training at a vocational school. A master plumber must pass an exam that typically encompasses both written and practical knowledge. They must also complete continuing education hours every year. Oftentimes the business owner, a master plumber is subject to inspection and must make sure all journeyman plumbers working for his or her company are in compliance with plumbing regulations.
Disclaimer: Plumbers Today is a free service that connects users with plumbers in their area. All contractors are independent and are in no way affiliated with Plumbers Today. Plumbers Today can neither endorse nor guarantee the quality of any work performed. It is the responsibility of each user to vet the contractor that he or she hires, and to confirm that the contractor meets all licensing and insurance requirements in that jurisdiction.
“Don’t assume that every Mr. Fix-it advertising his services in the local Pennysaver or on Craigslist is a licensed plumber,” says one New York plumber. There is no national standard for issuing licenses. Some plumbers are licensed by the state, others by the counties they work in. Check with your local city hall or chamber of commerce. They should be able to direct you to the appropriate source for a list of licensed plumbers in your area.

If you have a major fix in your home, it’s important to shop around for a plumber to do the work. At least three bids will help you determine the range of the project, so you can weigh the pros and cons of price and the reputation of the plumbers. Get references and contact them. Also, a good plumber isn’t likely to nickel and dime you. For the smaller jobs, check out these 11 plumbing tricks.


Plumbing is one of those things you don't give much thought to, until it fails. We understand that. We also understand just how fast plumbing shoots to the top of your list of important things when there's a problem. But that's the beauty of Plumbers Today. We love plumbing, and we think about all your residential plumbing needs year-round so you don't have to.
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Ryan arrived right on time and was very cordial and friendly. He got right to work and provided me a very thorough description of the things that needed attention, and subsequently provided pricing for each of the requested service options and the extras that were also identified. He really did a great job and we were extremely satisfied. I recommended your company to a friend yesterday, and will definitely continue to use and recommend your company for future plumbing needs!Bravo Zulu Ryan.
Jimmy P removed a 6 inch diameter root that had grown around my main water line. He was diligent in finding our the cause of the leak, kept me informed throughout the process and made sure that I was up and running with water for my family in less than an 8 hour period. It was a huge undertaking. Jimmy P was first class and polite . The had the necessary experience that was needed to get this water main break under control. He made the best of a horrible situation. Extremely pleasant and talented. I would highly suggest that all of my friends request Jimmy P at ATOMIC!

Most large cities today pipe solid wastes to sewage treatment plants in order to separate and partially purify the water, before emptying into streams or other bodies of water. For potable water use, galvanized iron piping was commonplace in the United States from the late 1800s until around 1960. After that period, copper piping took over, first soft copper with flared fittings, then with rigid copper tubing utilizing soldered fittings.
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