Honesty is important to all of our employees. One way that we stay honest with our customers is by providing straightforward, upfront pricing. While other plumbers in Phoenix, AZ may surprise you with hidden fees or unexpected add-ons, we never keep our pricing a secret from you. Our experienced technicians know what it takes to complete a job, and they’ll let you know the exact cost before they get started. If you have any questions or concerns, we’re more than happy to talk with you and answer all your questions. We also provide different financing options that can help make your next project be a little friendlier on your wallet. Just ask us about them.
Wooden pipes were used in London and elsewhere during the 16th and 17th centuries. The pipes were hollowed-out logs, which were tapered at the end with a small hole in which the water would pass through.[16] The multiple pipes were then sealed together with hot animal fat. They were often used in Montreal and Boston in the 1800s, and built-up wooden tubes were widely used in the USA during the 20th century. These pipes, used in place of corrugated iron or reinforced concrete pipes, were made of sections cut from short lengths of wood. Locking of adjacent rings with hardwood dowel pins produced a flexible structure. About 100,000 feet of these wooden pipes were installed during WW2 in drainage culverts, storm sewers and conduits, under highways and at army camps, naval stations, airfields and ordnance plants.

We have an outstanding reputation with the community and several water sanitation districts. We have an “A” rating with the BBB. We have been nominated for Angie’s list for many years in a row. You will never get an answering service when you call our company. You will reach the owners. The owner’s founded this plumbing company upon the idea of providing exceptional plumbing services for a fair and honest price. See details of our service guarantee

You may second guess that bacon grease going down the drain, but it seems a lot easier than trying to clean it out with a paper towel, right? Plumbers beg of you to have some patience, and instead of pouring it down the kitchen sink drain, allow it to harden, scrape it into a garbage can and wipe out the pan with the paper towel before washing. It will save you money in the long run. Here’s how to unclog a standard kitchen sink drain.


Mounted under the sink, the garbage disposal is meant for chopping up small bits of waste food.  When switched on the motor spins and impellers — also called lugs — throw bits of food against a grinder ring. You should always run water while using the garbage disposal; once the garbage disposal does its job, the water flushes the finely chopped particles down the drain.
Don’t fix it if it’s not broken, right? While the saying makes sense, when it comes to plumbing, it’s best to simply keep an eye on things. This means not overlooking toilets, sink drains, pipes and valves. And, it’s a good idea to schedule an annual maintenance appointment with your plumber, so you don’t have to pay a ton of money later! Got a leak? Here’s how to fix a water-shutoff valve that’s leaking.
Clogged drains or sewer line backups can wreak havoc on your business, and we know that plumbing emergencies rarely align with business hours. Sudden, unexpected plumbing emergencies can have a serious negative impact on your business—any amount of downtime can result in missed opportunities and the inability to serve your clients, potentially leading to lost revenue. When plumbing emergencies occur at your place of business, you need an emergency plumber you can trust.
A conventional water heater is recognized as a cylindrical storage tank ranging in size from 20 to 80 gallons in capacity. This tank is typically insulated with one or two elements that heat the water to the temperature set on the thermostat. Conventional water heaters have been used for decades in residential and commercial buildings. However, this method of constantly heating or keeping the tank of water hot is not very energy efficient, especially if you don’t have a need for hot water 24 hours a day.
I was disappointed with the pressure of a tub and shower that were plumbed with 1/2 supply lines (2nd floor). Could be low pressure from the street, but I want to replace with 5/8. Plus, I'd like to have 2 back to back showers, one inside and one outside. So, I had intended to bring a 1 supply to both, then branch up to valves and shower head with 5/8. Finally, I thought pressure from the street was typically 55 to 70 psi and I am concerned if pvc can take that.Any thoughts?

Rooter Plumbing

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