Menards® has everything you need for your plumbing supplies. Update your plumbing with our selection of pipe, tubing, hoses, fittings, and accessories. We offer pipe, hoses and tubing, and fittings in different sizes for all applications. Install new plumbing features or make necessary repairs with our plumbing installation and repair products. We offer a variety of tools for faucet repair, including aerators, O-rings, and washers. Use our selection of pipe cements, cleaners, and primers to maintain your plumbing. Make other repairs with our soldering compounds and accessories. Hydronic radiant heat systems use hot water to heat your home and keep you comfortable all year long. We offer a variety of sewage basins and septic tanks to fit your home as well as valves for many different applications. Our plumbing access panels are durable and dependable. Menards® offers everything you need to update your sink or tub with our selection of utility sinks and accessories and tub drains, overflows, and accessories. We also offer a wide selection of refrigeration line sets.
plumbing, piping systems inside buildings for water supply and sewage. The Romans had a highly developed plumbing system; water was brought to Rome by aqueducts and distributed to homes in lead pipes—hence the name plumbing from the Latin word plumbum for lead. During the Middle Ages, however, plumbing became almost nonexistent. In fact, London's first water system after the Middle Ages (c.1515) consisted partly of the rehabilitated Roman system; the rest was patterned after it. Modern plumbing began in the early 1800s, when steam engines became capable of supplying water under pressure and cheap cast iron pipes could be supplied to carry it. The common materials used today in water supply pipes are steel, copper, brass, plastic, and lead. Plumbing for sewage is made of cast iron, steel, asbestos cement, copper, and plastic. Water pressure is usually insufficient to supply the needs of tall apartment and office buildings; in such cases storage tanks are installed on the roof, into which a pump lifts water. The water then flows through the piping system of the building by gravity. Smaller buildings may have a pneumatic tank for the same purpose. The tank is partly filled with air, which is compressed when water is pumped in so that it will force water through the pipes. Sewage and drain systems typically have a trap, often a loop-shaped section of pipe, to seal off vapors in the pipes from the rest of the building. Vent pipes lead these vapors to the outside of the building; they also eliminate any suction in the piping and thus prevent the siphoning of water from traps when a nearby fixture discharges. In the 1970s and 80s flexible polybutylene plumbing was widely installed in standard and mobile homes. When unprecedented numbers of these plastic pipes began leaking because of exposure to chlorine and other chemicals in tap water, homeowners brought class-action lawsuits against the manufacturers, which were settled in 1995 for hundreds of millions of dollars.
I have used atomic a couple of times and have received nothing but great service! When we first bought our house, we hadn't moved to the area yet and weren't moving for another month. We drove down for a weekend to get the A.C. replaced, and found the sink in the master bath (that the previous owner just had installed) had flooded the whole bedroom. I believe it was Eric who helped us, and he was wonderful. Despite it being July, and no A.C, he took care of us without complaint. And because we were going back home in the next couple days he made sure to get it done quickly!Recently we decided to replace our water heater and didn't hesitate to call Atomic. Ryan and Zach helped us this time and provided the same level of service I expected! They were polite, clean and made sure everything went smoothly. Atomic is definitely a little pricer than some smaller companies, but you get what you pay for and I'd rather pay to get it done correctly the first time than later when your water line snaps in the master bathroom and you're out of town.

Most large cities today pipe solid wastes to sewage treatment plants in order to separate and partially purify the water, before emptying into streams or other bodies of water. For potable water use, galvanized iron piping was commonplace in the United States from the late 1800s until around 1960. After that period, copper piping took over, first soft copper with flared fittings, then with rigid copper tubing utilizing soldered fittings.


The most common residential drain to cause problems is the kitchen sink drain. Food particles, grease, soap or detergent build up can all, over time, slow down or completely block the flow of water down to the septic or sewer system. A garbage disposal as well as an installed dishwasher add more pipes to the mix which create more potential for clogs.

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