I used Go Green Express Home Services for a minor plastic pipe repair under my kitchen sink...The worker did a great job fixing this minor pipe plastic pipe repair( my original pipe was too short and he needed to extended the pipe and then reconnect). It took him less than 10 minutes to fix. I was first quoted $125 +tax but when the worker went to his truck and spoke to whoever he spoke to at the office, the price rose to $155.10 +tax for a total of $167.10...I thought that was a little too high. Will I use this company again, I Don't Know. It would be helpful if they would have a set price list for jobs (minor repairs, Major repairs etc...), then you as the consumer can see beforehand what the cost maybe and work from there with the company. Minor repairs, Major repairs this company should at least have a set-price list. ..The worker was great and efficient and did a good job on the repair but their prices are a bit costly. And yes, I did write this in their review.
Those who attempted to bring plumbing indoors faced technical as well as attitudinal challenges. Decisions on how wastewater was removed required as much concern as those made to ensure an adequate water supply. But equally vexing was the prevailing miasma theory of disease, which held that illnesses stemmed from "bad air" that was readily identifiable by its offensive odor. This led to a distrust of early indoor plumbing that tended to leak and a deadly fear of the sewer gas that accompanied the leaks. It is no wonder then that many individuals maintained a strong belief that elimination was best taken care of out of doors.
If left unfixed, a running toilet or a leaky faucet can end up costing you hundreds of dollars. Check out your water bill and how your water is running. If you find your kitchen dripping non-stop and your water bill going higher, you may have a leak! Let Parker & Sons put a stop to those leaks. Our team of expert plumbers will make sure to get the work done faster, get it right the first time, and do it efficiently.
plumbing, piping systems inside buildings for water supply and sewage. The Romans had a highly developed plumbing system; water was brought to Rome by aqueducts and distributed to homes in lead pipes—hence the name plumbing from the Latin word plumbum for lead. During the Middle Ages, however, plumbing became almost nonexistent. In fact, London's first water system after the Middle Ages (c.1515) consisted partly of the rehabilitated Roman system; the rest was patterned after it. Modern plumbing began in the early 1800s, when steam engines became capable of supplying water under pressure and cheap cast iron pipes could be supplied to carry it. The common materials used today in water supply pipes are steel, copper, brass, plastic, and lead. Plumbing for sewage is made of cast iron, steel, asbestos cement, copper, and plastic. Water pressure is usually insufficient to supply the needs of tall apartment and office buildings; in such cases storage tanks are installed on the roof, into which a pump lifts water. The water then flows through the piping system of the building by gravity. Smaller buildings may have a pneumatic tank for the same purpose. The tank is partly filled with air, which is compressed when water is pumped in so that it will force water through the pipes. Sewage and drain systems typically have a trap, often a loop-shaped section of pipe, to seal off vapors in the pipes from the rest of the building. Vent pipes lead these vapors to the outside of the building; they also eliminate any suction in the piping and thus prevent the siphoning of water from traps when a nearby fixture discharges. In the 1970s and 80s flexible polybutylene plumbing was widely installed in standard and mobile homes. When unprecedented numbers of these plastic pipes began leaking because of exposure to chlorine and other chemicals in tap water, homeowners brought class-action lawsuits against the manufacturers, which were settled in 1995 for hundreds of millions of dollars.
Our goal in business is to treat all of our customers like friends; always treating them with respect, fairness, and honesty. We are a family owned and operated Connecticut plumbing company, and because of this all of our customers receive the attention that they deserve. Mike Marandino, the owner of the company, (as well as master plumber) works out on the road right alongside his employees. He or his wife handles all calls personally and it's the personal touch that makes us special. We strive for 100% satisfaction, and if for any reason a customer of ours isn't satisfied we promise we'll make it right.
A conventional water heater is recognized as a cylindrical storage tank ranging in size from 20 to 80 gallons in capacity. This tank is typically insulated with one or two elements that heat the water to the temperature set on the thermostat. Conventional water heaters have been used for decades in residential and commercial buildings. However, this method of constantly heating or keeping the tank of water hot is not very energy efficient, especially if you don’t have a need for hot water 24 hours a day.

When you’re searching for a dependable Dallas plumber or Dallas plumbing company “near me” which offers licensed and trained plumbers for any plumbing repair or plumbing installation like water heaters, tankless heaters, garbage disposals, drain or sewer lines, water filtration, water softening or other plumbing needs, call 214-892-2225214-892-2225.
Keeping your trash dispoal clean isn't very difficult or time consuming. Fill the sink at least half full of soapy water. Remove the stopper from the drain while simultaneously turning on the disposal. This will fill the entire disposal with soapy water and help to flush out food buildup. It will also clean the blades and flush your pipes with clean water.
While it’s their job to make sure your pipes work like a well-oiled machine, it’s not their job to rebuild the wall they had to demolish to make that happen. So, while you’re going to get that water problem fixed, you’ll want to discuss in detail what kind of “mess” they might leave behind prior to the start of the project so you can plan accordingly. Remember, there are some jobs you can do yourself. Here’s how to solder copper pipe joints!

Some allege that putting a brick in the toilet tank can save water, but doing that can keep your toilet from flushing correctly. Another plumbing tip, avoid liquid drain cleaners. Liquid drain cleaners are also bad news—they eat away at the pipes. Try a plunger or, better yet, a $30 auger. Don’t have either? Here’s how to unclog a toilet without a plunger.
The most common residential drain to cause problems is the kitchen sink drain. Food particles, grease, soap or detergent build up can all, over time, slow down or completely block the flow of water down to the septic or sewer system. A garbage disposal as well as an installed dishwasher add more pipes to the mix which create more potential for clogs.
Where plumbing had been a mostly locally regulated matter for most of its history, the federal government became involved in the early 1990s. Until the 1950s, toilets generally used five or more gallons per flush (GPF). During the decades that followed, the plumbing industry reduced the standard volume for toilet flush tanks to 3.5 gallons. A further reduction in volume resulted from the Energy Policy Act of 1992, which in the name of conservation mandated that all new toilets made in the United States must use no more than 1.6 GPF. The same legislation also regulated the flow in shower heads and faucets. Although the first low-flow toilets proved un-satisfactory and were met with public disapproval, redesigned equipment employing new technology has removed most objections.

Help! The toilet won’t stop running. It’s a bummer, sure, but it’s something you don’t need to call your plumber about. In fact, DIYers should take note that it’s a quick fix that will cost you just $5. For instance, your handle might just be sticking, which can be solved by spraying some lubricant where the handle meets the porcelain. Ready to DIY? Here’s how to fix a running toilet.


Plumbing originated during ancient civilizations such as the Greek, Roman, Persian, Indian, and Chinese cities as they developed public baths and needed to provide potable water and wastewater removal, for larger numbers of people.[6] Standardized earthen plumbing pipes with broad flanges making use of asphalt for preventing leakages appeared in the urban settlements of the Indus Valley Civilization by 2700 BC.[7] The Romans used lead pipe inscriptions to prevent water theft. The word "plumber" dates from the Roman Empire.[8] The Latin for lead is plumbum. Roman roofs used lead in conduits and drain pipes[9] and some were also covered with lead. Lead was also used for piping and for making baths.[10]
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