Severe plumbing emergencies can cause a lot of collateral damage and result in high costs if not addressed immediately. For example, if your basement floods at 2:00 A.M., it’s vital that an emergency plumber visits right away to resolve the problem and prevent further water damage. Our technicians can arrive at your residence as soon as possible, bringing state-of-the-art equipment to address the plumbing emergency, complete the job in a timely and efficient manner, and get your household plumbing systems back to normal quickly.

You are sitting in your living room and hear what sounds like water dripping. You check all the sink faucets, toilets, tubs, showers, spigots. Nothing is on that you can see. You return to your chair. You still hear the sound. It’s not the dishwasher or washing machine either. Not the ice maker in the freezer. What is making the sound? You retrace your steps, this time checking inside the cabinet under each sink. Ah ha! There it is. Your kitchen drain pipe is dripping. Leak detected.


Just because they’re not in your sight on a daily basis doesn’t mean you should ignore your septic lines. If you have a septic system, lateral septic lines will be buried beneath some of your property. Be sure to avoid them! For example, don’t drive a heavy vehicle over them because that can cause them to collapse and result in a costly fix. Not sure how a septic tank works? Here’s the info.


It only seems right to put cleaning supplies, like sponges, rags and liquids, under the sink, but plumbers say NO to this. Besides just being in the way, they can cause trap leaks. Drain traps, which are the curved pipes under the sink, are meant to keep sewer gases from entering your home, while also allowing waste water to pass. Blocking them off with clutter ups the risk of your cleaning products and trash can bumping into the pipes and dislodging them. Don’t feel bad if you’ve made a plumping mistake. Here are 36 almost unbelievable plumbing and electrical goofs.

I was disappointed with the pressure of a tub and shower that were plumbed with 1/2 supply lines (2nd floor). Could be low pressure from the street, but I want to replace with 5/8. Plus, I'd like to have 2 back to back showers, one inside and one outside. So, I had intended to bring a 1 supply to both, then branch up to valves and shower head with 5/8. Finally, I thought pressure from the street was typically 55 to 70 psi and I am concerned if pvc can take that.Any thoughts?

Rooter Plumbing

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