I had 207 Plumbing come to fix a leak in my ceiling.  It's a terrible, terrible company to do business with.  He came and fixed a broken pipe in the ceiling, and I asked him to check the rest of the pipe to make sure that nothing else was broken, he said everything was OK and charged me $219.00 for 45 minutes and left.  Never cleaned up his mess.  I went to clean up the mess after he left and found there was more damage to the pipe.  I called him to come back, which he did.  He looked at the water coming down from the ceiling, into a light fixture and said he had another job to go to and couldn't come back until next week.  He also wanted to charge me $350.00 to come back.  I told him that was too much and he said he would make an exception and only charge me $219.00.  Now I have major damage done to the ceiling, the light fixture and the floor.  All of this could have been prevented if he had stayed and fixed the problem.  I will NOT hire him again.

For many centuries, lead was the favoured material for water pipes, because its malleability made it practical to work into the desired shape. (Such use was so common that the word "plumbing" derives from plumbum, the Latin word for lead.) This was a source of lead-related health problems in the years before the health hazards of ingesting lead were fully understood; among these were stillbirths and high rates of infant mortality. Lead water pipes were still widely used in the early 20th century, and remain in many households. In addition, lead-tin alloy solder was commonly used to join copper pipes, but modern practice uses tin-antimony alloy solder instead, in order to eliminate lead hazards.[13]
With a reputation for outstanding work, At Your Service Plumbing Company is a Denver plumbing company providing services to Arvada, Aurora, Boulder, Broomfield, Centennial, Columbine, Commerce City, Denver, Edgewater, Englewood, Federal Heights, Firestone, Frederick, Golden, Gunbarrel, Highlands Ranch, Ken Caryl, Lakeside, Lakewood, Littleton, Longmont, Louisville, Northglenn, Sherrelwood, Thornton, Welby, Westminster and Wheat Ridge. Learn more about our service guarantee
Using a licensed Toronto plumber? This is an absolute MUST when it comes to the function of your plumbing system and the protection of your home. It’s up to you to avoid non-certified plumbers and those who claim to be certified but have no proof. Don’t end up with more problems than you already have. Do your research, choose wisely and confirm the necessary certifications before you hire a Toronto plumbing team. Drain Rescue plumbers are licensed, bonded and insured – and we’ve got the paperwork to prove it! Read more. Read more

Present-day water-supply systems use a network of high-pressure pumps, and pipes in buildings are now made of copper,[25] brass, plastic (particularly cross-linked polyethylene called PEX, which is estimated to be used in 60% of single-family homes[26]), or other nontoxic material. Due to its toxicity, most cities moved away from lead water-supply piping by the 1920s in the United States,[27] although lead pipes were approved by national plumbing codes into the 1980s,[28] and lead was used in plumbing solder for drinking water until it was banned in 1986.[27] Drain and vent lines are made of plastic, steel, cast-iron, or lead.[29][30]

I had 207 Plumbing come to fix a leak in my ceiling.  It's a terrible, terrible company to do business with.  He came and fixed a broken pipe in the ceiling, and I asked him to check the rest of the pipe to make sure that nothing else was broken, he said everything was OK and charged me $219.00 for 45 minutes and left.  Never cleaned up his mess.  I went to clean up the mess after he left and found there was more damage to the pipe.  I called him to come back, which he did.  He looked at the water coming down from the ceiling, into a light fixture and said he had another job to go to and couldn't come back until next week.  He also wanted to charge me $350.00 to come back.  I told him that was too much and he said he would make an exception and only charge me $219.00.  Now I have major damage done to the ceiling, the light fixture and the floor.  All of this could have been prevented if he had stayed and fixed the problem.  I will NOT hire him again.
Sump pumps are used to re-route water away from the lowest point of your home's foundation and protect your basement and easily damaged areas from flooding. In most cases, your sump pump is hardwired to your electrical system or possibly plugged into a wall outlet. Because these power sources can often fail in a storm when water damage occurs, sump pumps are typically equipped with battery backup power.
If the water in your house is not getting hot, it may be time for water heater repair. Nationally, the average water heater repair cost ranges between $120 and $200, although prices can range up to $400, depending on the problem and materials. Competent homeowners may also be able to try DIY fixes, whether they have a traditional gas or electric water heater or a tankless gas or electric heater. Troubleshooting the different issues that can arise with each of the styles requires some knowledge of how they operate and what red flags to look out for. For a natural gas water heater, the first step is to check whether the pilot light has gone out. It’s important to follow the manufacturer’s directions if you want to relight it yourself. If you smell gas, stop everything and call your gas company — the smell could signal a dangerous gas leak. If your household’s water is not getting hot enough, you can try increasing the temperature on the water heater’s front dial above the standard setting of 120 degrees; for safety, always turn off electricity to the unit before adjusting temperatures. If you keep running out of hot water, your household may simply need a higher-capacity water heater, so consider upgrading. Quick professional fixes include replacing the thermostat or heating elements and cleaning and repairing the thermocouple.
Those who attempted to bring plumbing indoors faced technical as well as attitudinal challenges. Decisions on how wastewater was removed required as much concern as those made to ensure an adequate water supply. But equally vexing was the prevailing miasma theory of disease, which held that illnesses stemmed from "bad air" that was readily identifiable by its offensive odor. This led to a distrust of early indoor plumbing that tended to leak and a deadly fear of the sewer gas that accompanied the leaks. It is no wonder then that many individuals maintained a strong belief that elimination was best taken care of out of doors.

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