"Michael completed an emergency repair for us on a Sunday night-- I wasn't having any luck finding plumbers that could handle an emergency repair. We had a constant stream of water coming out of our main water valve shut off in the house. We couldn't find the outside turn off valve- so we were in trouble. He came out right away, showed us how to turn off the main line into the house (we could find the box, but not the valve to turn off) and then repaired the inside valve. Costs were very reasonable for a Sunday night emergency call. We'll be installing a tankless water heater soon and he will get our business! Highly recommend!!"
Big or small, BEST Plumbing Service of Cincinnati handles it all! We strive to handle every project with the highest level of excellence. Our Cincinnati plumbing company has eliminated thousands of plumbing headaches from the residential and commercial property owners we serve. When you’re in need of a plumbing repair, replacement, a new installation or routine maintenance, we’re the plumbers to call. We stand behind the excellent work we do for our customers. Watch this video to learn more about our services.
Where plumbing had been a mostly locally regulated matter for most of its history, the federal government became involved in the early 1990s. Until the 1950s, toilets generally used five or more gallons per flush (GPF). During the decades that followed, the plumbing industry reduced the standard volume for toilet flush tanks to 3.5 gallons. A further reduction in volume resulted from the Energy Policy Act of 1992, which in the name of conservation mandated that all new toilets made in the United States must use no more than 1.6 GPF. The same legislation also regulated the flow in shower heads and faucets. Although the first low-flow toilets proved un-satisfactory and were met with public disapproval, redesigned equipment employing new technology has removed most objections.
To work independently, a plumber is required to receive a license. In most states, the prerequisite for earning this license is two to five years of practical experience. There's also an exam to test technical know-how and understanding of plumbing codes. The United Association's website offers extensive information on licensing requirements by state.

You’ll know when it’s time to install a new water heater. Water heater installation costs average between $360 and $780 nationally, with rates increasing depending on the project. The total project cost will be higher when you include the cost of the heater itself. Select your new water heater based on the number of occupants in your home and the number of gallons of capacity you’ll need. Installation costs can vary based on the type of water heater you are removing and the type you are installing, any necessary repairs, regional cost of labor, and whether disposal of the old heater is included. Natural gas water heaters retail on average between $650 and $900 for standard models. Electric water heaters range between $300 and $700 for standard models. Tankless electric water heaters retail on average between $250 and $700 for standard models. Tankless gas water heaters retail on average between $200 and $1,300.


Heaney Plumbing & Heating relies on the most advanced diagnostic tools to assess your pipes. Through camera line inspection, sewer video inspection and other methods, not only can we tell if a plumbing repair or upgrade is warranted, but we can quickly determine where and how to perform it. With our help, your home or business will never be vulnerable to unseen decay.
We have used Atomic multiple times and every time they have done a phenomenal job! We've had 2 different plumbing specialist, both named Justin, and each have been wonderful and knowledgeable in helping us with our problems. Our most recent issue was a leaking service line. Atomic had Justin D. to my house at 7pm, and was able to schedule me for next day repairs! I will only use and recommend Atomic as my plumbing service!

A handyman walked away from the job after cutting off the water to my mother's house and removing a toilet. He did this while I was attending a funeral. My mother is 87 years old. Called Atomic Plumbing and Ryan Dean responded Saturday afternoon and restored water to the house. He finished the job Sunday morning. He was the nicest, courteous, neat plumber I have ever met. I can't say enough good things about Atomic Plumbing from the employee who took my call to Ryan Dean's excellent service.
So thankful I made the call. The front office associate was very pleasant and shared the practice of what to expect on my service day. Technician Randy arrived within my service window, immediately introduced himself and presented me with his business card. I was also introduced to his assistant Tim who was also very polite. They also had shoe covers they placed on before entering my rooms (how thoughtful). The service was reviewed and cost to complete the job, authorization given and Randy started the task. I am pleased with the job, great TEAM. Thank you!

Try a plunger: If it's a double sink, use a wet rag or rubber stopper to block the other drain. Place the plunger directly over the drain until it forms an air-tight seal. If you have trouble forming an air-tight seal with the plunger, run it under some hot water to make it more flexible. Move the plunger up and down to dislodge the clog from the drain.

The straight sections of plumbing systems are called "pipes" or "tubes". A pipe is typically formed via casting or welding, whereas a tube is made through extrusion. Pipe normally has thicker walls and may be threaded or welded, while tubing is thinner-walled and requires special joining techniques such as brazing, compression fitting, crimping, or for plastics, solvent welding. These joining techniques are discussed in more detail in the piping and plumbing fittings article.
Are you 100% satisfied with the quality of the water in your home? It doesn’t matter if you use a private well or if you get your water from the municipal supply. There is no guarantee that your water is going to be of the high quality that you both deserve and demand. That is where our water treatment system professionals come in. When you hire us, we can test your water to determine precisely what’s gone wrong. We can then install the exact type of water treatment system that you need to get the most out of your water supply.
There’s a reason we’ve earned the title of “The Smell Good Plumber.” Our Phoenix plumbers take pride in every aspect of their work – from the job they do to their appearance and cleanliness while on the job. When you contract our company for a job, you can expect our professional technicians to be just that – professional. Our technicians will show up at your home or business with a clean and neat appearance. You don’t have to worry about the stereotypical, inappropriate plumber’s garb with our professionals. You also don’t have to worry about them leaving a big mess behind. They’ll make sure to clean up after a job has been completed, so you can just sit back, relax, and let us do the work.
Atomic Plumbing & Drain Cleaning provided Expert Plumber Jimmy Powell to diagnose and perform an emergency repair at my home. I had experienced flooding from poor workmanship by one of their competitors, who then refused to help me. When I contacted Atomic Plumbing with an emergency request, they stepped up immediately to assist me, and sent their plumber Jimmy P., who identified and corrected the poor workmanship that caused the flooding. Very knowledgeable in his trade, confident in the correction that he crafted, and he is a genuine good person. I would have been pleased with that much, but the reasonable price for the emergency work and the 1 year warranty that Jimmy presented on behalf of Atomic Plumbing brought it all home for me. This is a company that stands behind their good name and will send you the very best plumbing professionals when you are having a bad plumbing day. I am so glad that I contacted Atomic and met Jimmy. You will be too. Call Atomic Plumbing FIRST!

plumbing, piping systems inside buildings for water supply and sewage. The Romans had a highly developed plumbing system; water was brought to Rome by aqueducts and distributed to homes in lead pipes—hence the name plumbing from the Latin word plumbum for lead. During the Middle Ages, however, plumbing became almost nonexistent. In fact, London's first water system after the Middle Ages (c.1515) consisted partly of the rehabilitated Roman system; the rest was patterned after it. Modern plumbing began in the early 1800s, when steam engines became capable of supplying water under pressure and cheap cast iron pipes could be supplied to carry it. The common materials used today in water supply pipes are steel, copper, brass, plastic, and lead. Plumbing for sewage is made of cast iron, steel, asbestos cement, copper, and plastic. Water pressure is usually insufficient to supply the needs of tall apartment and office buildings; in such cases storage tanks are installed on the roof, into which a pump lifts water. The water then flows through the piping system of the building by gravity. Smaller buildings may have a pneumatic tank for the same purpose. The tank is partly filled with air, which is compressed when water is pumped in so that it will force water through the pipes. Sewage and drain systems typically have a trap, often a loop-shaped section of pipe, to seal off vapors in the pipes from the rest of the building. Vent pipes lead these vapors to the outside of the building; they also eliminate any suction in the piping and thus prevent the siphoning of water from traps when a nearby fixture discharges. In the 1970s and 80s flexible polybutylene plumbing was widely installed in standard and mobile homes. When unprecedented numbers of these plastic pipes began leaking because of exposure to chlorine and other chemicals in tap water, homeowners brought class-action lawsuits against the manufacturers, which were settled in 1995 for hundreds of millions of dollars.
Plumbing reached its early apex in ancient Rome, which saw the introduction of expansive systems of aqueducts, tile wastewater removal, and widespread use of lead pipes. With the Fall of Rome both water supply and sanitation stagnated—or regressed—for well over 1,000 years. Improvement was very slow, with little effective progress made until the growth of modern densely populated cities in the 1800s. During this period, public health authorities began pressing for better waste disposal systems to be installed, to prevent or control epidemics of disease. Earlier, the waste disposal system had merely consisted of collecting waste and dumping it on the ground or into a river. Eventually the development of separate, underground water and sewage systems eliminated open sewage ditches and cesspools.
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