In urban areas, the emptying of chamber pots straight into the street, and the accumulation of piles of human waste, resulted in disease and an unpleasant urban environment. Night-soil men were often employed to collect excreta, which was spread on the fields as fertilizer. Although Sir John Harrington had developed an indoor flushing toilet for Queen Elizabeth I in 1596, it was not until the rise of mass industrialization and urbanization in the nineteenth century that domestic toilets were mass-produced in northern England. Flushing technology was improved through the efforts of inventive manufacturers such as John Shanks, George Jennings, Alexander Cummings, and Thomas Crapper in the United Kingdom (Reyburn 1969) and Thomas Maddocks, John Randall Mann, William Campbell, and Henry Demarest, among others, in the United States (Palmer 1973). Early toilet manufacturers were generally companies that had first made their name in the manufacture of china and earthenware. Such English companies as Minton, Twyford, and Doulton adapted their production processes to make porcelain toilet bowls and pans. Toilet design was based upon the “sit” rather than “squat” mode of excretion (which required nothing more than a hole in the ground). The sit approach required a specific and highly marketable consumer product, the “pedestal” toilet, along with all the plumbing fixtures, such as taps (faucets), cisterns, basins, and fittings that together made up the “bathroom.” Interestingly, urinals for men, although a common feature of public toilets, are not generally a feature of private domestic bathrooms. These artifacts were exported from Britain to the rest of the world as a sign of modernity and Western progress, and were rapidly adopted for fear of being seen as “backward” or “dirty,” in spite of the fact that the majority of the world’s population squats when eliminating waste, a position that is ergonomically more healthy and efficient.
Compartmentalization of production was marked by separate metal-manufacture companies specializing in lead piping, plumbing fixtures, and other nonporcelain components. Nowadays, international toilet companies such as Armitage Shanks, Ideal Standard, and Geberit have diversified to offer a wide range of toilet technologies and materials. Synthetic materials now predominate; piping is made of plastic and the “porcelain” is more likely to be polymer. Old and widely used lead piping has been condemned as a potential cause of poisoning. (Plumbing gets its name from plomb, the medieval word for lead, as plumbers were essentially lead workers.)
A conventional water heater is recognized as a cylindrical storage tank ranging in size from 20 to 80 gallons in capacity. This tank is typically insulated with one or two elements that heat the water to the temperature set on the thermostat. Conventional water heaters have been used for decades in residential and commercial buildings. However, this method of constantly heating or keeping the tank of water hot is not very energy efficient, especially if you don’t have a need for hot water 24 hours a day.
Need a quick fix? After having a plumber come out to your house, they might tell you the part needed to fix your toilet or sink issue is going to take a week. Don’t be too amenable if you can’t wait. There’s no shame in working with another plumber who can get the part and do the job when you need it. If you’re doing the job yourself, be sure you know these tips for completing a plumbing fix like a pro.
Do you need a professional plumber and considering Stemmle Plumbing? With our professional team of plumbers, we have built a solid reputation on the quality of our plumbing, drain, HVAC, Septic and Electrical Services.  Whether it is their home or business, our customers know we can quickly solve their system issues keeping their downtime to a minimum. We stay educated in modern technology such as trenchless pipe replacement, video inspections, tankless water heaters and no dig pipe repair, to offer you the best service the industry has to offer.
Yes I do know what approximately the part is and how much but the problem is  almost all plumbers & even electricians want $100 service call.  That's ridiculous as if the part is $25 that $125 to me and that's too much but I see they want the $$$$ so they start with a service call. Example my outdoor light bulb broke and I couldn't get it out of socket.  I had to call electrician.  Yes, $100 service call, handed me the bulb and I gave him a new one to put it and that was it. Took him all of 10 min.  So now I hesitate when I need something done in these fields and thank goodness so far I'm not in need of anything..
Power surges are one of the biggest hazards to the electrical circuits in your home. BelRed Energy Solutions understands the ways newer heating and cooling equipment use sensitive electronic components, and how to install surge protectors to preserve those electronics from power surges. For more information on the best ways to protect your home, call BelRed Energy…
If you decide to try this job yourself, be prepared to keep meticulous track of about a dozen tiny parts (put the stopper in the sink so none of them fall down the drain). There are many different faucet designs, so you may not be able to tell what to replace until you've done the disassembly. Whether you do it yourself or hire a plumber, this would be a good time to think about whether you want to upgrade the faucet with a new design.
Bob Carter started as with plumbers Indianapolis and moved his family to Greenwood in the late 1960’s.  He continued to do plumbing in Indianapolis and soon became a plumber in Greenwood as well.  Fast forward to today… Carter’s My Plumber is a 3rd Generation, family-owned Plumbing business operating from Greenwood, and serving the Indianapolis metro area. Son, Jamie and Grandson, Kelson now run the family business.

Rooter Plumbing Co

×