I was disappointed with the pressure of a tub and shower that were plumbed with 1/2 supply lines (2nd floor). Could be low pressure from the street, but I want to replace with 5/8. Plus, I'd like to have 2 back to back showers, one inside and one outside. So, I had intended to bring a 1 supply to both, then branch up to valves and shower head with 5/8. Finally, I thought pressure from the street was typically 55 to 70 psi and I am concerned if pvc can take that.Any thoughts?

This information is not intended as an offer to sell, or the solicitation of an offer to buy, a franchise. It is for information purposes only. Read More Currently, the following states regulate the offer and sale of franchises: California, Hawaii, Illinois, Indiana, Maryland, Michigan, Minnesota, New York, North Dakota, Oregon, Rhode Island, South Dakota, Virginia, Washington, and Wisconsin. If you are a resident of or want to locate a franchise in one of these states, we will not offer you a franchise unless and until we have complied with applicable pre-sale registration and disclosure requirements in your state. Read Less Mr. Rooter is a registered trademark of Mr. Rooter LLC Copyright © 2017 Mr. Rooter, All rights reserved. All Mr. Rooter Plumbing Franchise Locations Are Independently Owned And Operated.

The Fluidmaster 400AKRP10 Complete Toilet Repair Kit was The Fluidmaster 400AKRP10 Complete Toilet Repair Kit was designed with performance in mind. The trusted and proven 400A toilet fill valve ensures a quiet and proper fill while the PerforMAX 2 in. Water-Saving Flapper adjusts to maximize water usage with each flush. This complete toilet repair kit also includes a ...  More + Product Details Close
Galvanized steel potable water supply and distribution pipes are commonly found with nominal pipe sizes from 3⁄8 inch (9.5 mm) to 2 inches (51 mm). It is rarely used today for new construction residential plumbing. Steel pipe has National Pipe Thread (NPT) standard tapered male threads, which connect with female tapered threads on elbows, tees, couplers, valves, and other fittings. Galvanized steel (often known simply as "galv" or "iron" in the plumbing trade) is relatively expensive, and difficult to work with due to weight and requirement of a pipe threader. It remains in common use for repair of existing "galv" systems and to satisfy building code non-combustibility requirements typically found in hotels, apartment buildings and other commercial applications. It is also extremely durable and resistant to mechanical abuse. Black lacquered steel pipe is the most widely used pipe material for fire sprinklers and natural gas.

Some allege that putting a brick in the toilet tank can save water, but doing that can keep your toilet from flushing correctly. Another plumbing tip, avoid liquid drain cleaners. Liquid drain cleaners are also bad news—they eat away at the pipes. Try a plunger or, better yet, a $30 auger. Don’t have either? Here’s how to unclog a toilet without a plunger.


Don R. is a “Superstar”! He quickly identified the outdated timer attached to our water that was malfunctioning, as it was making a very annoying grinding sound. He disconnected the timer and rerouted the power cable to the water heater. The problem was solved instantaneously. Moreover, Don had provided us with some useful information that we deemed valuable as well. Don, we truly appreciate your top notch service.P.S. You have restored peace back into my household.
Most plumbers, pipefitters, and steamfitters learn their trade through a 4- or 5-year apprenticeship. Apprentices typically receive 2,000 hours of paid on-the-job training, as well as some classroom instruction, each year. In the classroom, apprentices learn safety, local plumbing codes and regulations, and blueprint reading. They also study mathematics, applied physics, and chemistry. Apprenticeship programs are offered by unions and businesses. Although most workers enter apprenticeships directly, some start out as helpers. The Home Builders Institute offers a pre-apprenticeship training program in plumbing and other trades.
I have used atomic a couple of times and have received nothing but great service! When we first bought our house, we hadn't moved to the area yet and weren't moving for another month. We drove down for a weekend to get the A.C. replaced, and found the sink in the master bath (that the previous owner just had installed) had flooded the whole bedroom. I believe it was Eric who helped us, and he was wonderful. Despite it being July, and no A.C, he took care of us without complaint. And because we were going back home in the next couple days he made sure to get it done quickly!Recently we decided to replace our water heater and didn't hesitate to call Atomic. Ryan and Zach helped us this time and provided the same level of service I expected! They were polite, clean and made sure everything went smoothly. Atomic is definitely a little pricer than some smaller companies, but you get what you pay for and I'd rather pay to get it done correctly the first time than later when your water line snaps in the master bathroom and you're out of town.
Our goal in business is to treat all of our customers like friends; always treating them with respect, fairness, and honesty. We are a family owned and operated Connecticut plumbing company, and because of this all of our customers receive the attention that they deserve. Mike Marandino, the owner of the company, (as well as master plumber) works out on the road right alongside his employees. He or his wife handles all calls personally and it's the personal touch that makes us special. We strive for 100% satisfaction, and if for any reason a customer of ours isn't satisfied we promise we'll make it right.

Do you think you have a water leak in your house or business in Phoenix, San Diego and the Inland Empire? Does your floor feel hot? Have you noticed an unexpected increase in your Phoenix, San Diego and the Inland Empire water or gas bill? Our plumbers in Phoenix, San Diego and the Inland Empire are experts in the latest electronic leak detection technology.


You may second guess that bacon grease going down the drain, but it seems a lot easier than trying to clean it out with a paper towel, right? Plumbers beg of you to have some patience, and instead of pouring it down the kitchen sink drain, allow it to harden, scrape it into a garbage can and wipe out the pan with the paper towel before washing. It will save you money in the long run. Here’s how to unclog a standard kitchen sink drain.
Plumbing originated during ancient civilizations such as the Greek, Roman, Persian, Indian, and Chinese cities as they developed public baths and needed to provide potable water and wastewater removal, for larger numbers of people.[6] Standardized earthen plumbing pipes with broad flanges making use of asphalt for preventing leakages appeared in the urban settlements of the Indus Valley Civilization by 2700 BC.[7] The Romans used lead pipe inscriptions to prevent water theft. The word "plumber" dates from the Roman Empire.[8] The Latin for lead is plumbum. Roman roofs used lead in conduits and drain pipes[9] and some were also covered with lead. Lead was also used for piping and for making baths.[10]
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