Bravo, Don and Zach!! My bathroom was a total mess (leaking!) and with the holidays around the corner I was in desperate need of help. Don careful assessed the situation, walked me thru my options, and kept me aware of the next steps. I was never left wondering “what now?”. As promised, they arrived on-time and ready to begin. My house was kept protected from damage and the work was expertly finished. Warranties were explained and a walk-through revealed all the fine details. I am a fan of good work. Don and Zach exceeded all my expectations. I recommend using Atomic Plumbing to everyone.
You may or may not need a plumber to tighten the drain pipe to stop this particular leak, but what if that drip were behind the wall in your kitchen or bathroom, or behind a refrigerator or washing machine, where you may never see it until the water damage is so great it begins to grow mildew inside the walls causing a distinct odor in your room or entire house.

Both public and domestic toilet design is becoming increasingly technologically driven, with automatic flushes and sensor-controlled washing-and-drying facilities becoming commonplace. In parallel, environmental sustainability requirements to save water have resulted in a range of dual-flush cisterns, waterless urinals, and human-waste recycling innovations. High levels of toilet provision in every home, along with highly developed sewerage systems, are no longer necessarily seen as signs of progress and economic development. Such assumptions are now being questioned. Many parts of the world are not economically or environmentally in a position to build modern, expensive water and sewerage systems: It is not a high priority. Water is becoming an increasingly expensive and scarce resource; some see it as “the new oil” in terms of future geopolitical tensions. Far from being a sign of economic development, many see the emphasis upon water-based sewerage systems and flushing toilets as old fashioned, colonial, and unsustainable. Instead, new, more sustainable solutions are being developed, especially within prosperous advanced Asian countries that can afford such research. Such systems will incorporate the most modern technological and scientific advances in the fields of engineering, pathogen control, and urban governance (Chun 2002; Mara 2006).
You may or may not need a plumber to tighten the drain pipe to stop this particular leak, but what if that drip were behind the wall in your kitchen or bathroom, or behind a refrigerator or washing machine, where you may never see it until the water damage is so great it begins to grow mildew inside the walls causing a distinct odor in your room or entire house.
Locally owned and operated for over 30 years, BelRed has been providing high-quality service to customers since 1986. Begun as a small heating and air conditioning services business, we've grown into one of the largest HVAC companies in western Washington, and we credit our success to our decades of satisfied customers and HVAC products. Along with superior service, BelRed has always been at the forefront of HVAC offerings, and continues to offer new solutions to optimize comfort and efficiency.
For many centuries, lead was the favoured material for water pipes, because its malleability made it practical to work into the desired shape. (Such use was so common that the word "plumbing" derives from plumbum, the Latin word for lead.) This was a source of lead-related health problems in the years before the health hazards of ingesting lead were fully understood; among these were stillbirths and high rates of infant mortality. Lead water pipes were still widely used in the early 20th century, and remain in many households. In addition, lead-tin alloy solder was commonly used to join copper pipes, but modern practice uses tin-antimony alloy solder instead, in order to eliminate lead hazards.[13]
Plumbers, pipefitters, and steamfitters may use many different materials and construction techniques, depending on the type of project. Residential water systems, for example, use copper, steel, and plastic pipe that one or two plumbers can install. Power plant water systems, by contrast, are made of large steel pipes that usually take a crew of pipefitters to install. Some workers install stainless steel pipes on dairy farms and in factories, mainly to prevent contamination.
The difference between pipes and tubes is simply in the way it is sized. PVC pipe for plumbing applications and galvanized steel pipe for instance, are measured in IPS (iron pipe size). Copper tube, CPVC, PeX and other tubing is measured nominally, which is basically an average diameter. These sizing schemes allow for universal adaptation of transitional fittings. For instance, 1/2" PeX tubing is the same size as 1/2" copper tubing. 1/2" PVC on the other hand is not the same size as 1/2" tubing, and therefore requires either a threaded male or female adapter to connect them. When used in agricultural irrigation, the singular form "pipe" is often used as a plural.[19]
I was disappointed with the pressure of a tub and shower that were plumbed with 1/2 supply lines (2nd floor). Could be low pressure from the street, but I want to replace with 5/8. Plus, I'd like to have 2 back to back showers, one inside and one outside. So, I had intended to bring a 1 supply to both, then branch up to valves and shower head with 5/8. Finally, I thought pressure from the street was typically 55 to 70 psi and I am concerned if pvc can take that.Any thoughts?

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