Honesty is important to all of our employees. One way that we stay honest with our customers is by providing straightforward, upfront pricing. While other plumbers in Phoenix, AZ may surprise you with hidden fees or unexpected add-ons, we never keep our pricing a secret from you. Our experienced technicians know what it takes to complete a job, and they’ll let you know the exact cost before they get started. If you have any questions or concerns, we’re more than happy to talk with you and answer all your questions. We also provide different financing options that can help make your next project be a little friendlier on your wallet. Just ask us about them.
Several types of pipe were used during the nineteenth century. With little or no knowledge of its possible long-term harmful effects, lead pipe was widely used. Its low price and the ease with which it could be formed and joined made it the material of choice for many installations. Iron, brass, and copper pipe were used as well. It was not unusual for a structure to be plumbed with several types of pipe, each used where it was most suited. But by the early twentieth century there was a move away from lead piping. The basic elements of domestic plumbing, in both the kitchen and bathroom, were in place by the 1890s. Changes since that time have been primarily aesthetic and in the materials used. During the second half of the twentieth century, tubs and basins that previously had been made of glazed ceramic or enameled iron, and much of the pipe manufactured in the United States as well, were being made of plastic.
Compartmentalization of production was marked by separate metal-manufacture companies specializing in lead piping, plumbing fixtures, and other nonporcelain components. Nowadays, international toilet companies such as Armitage Shanks, Ideal Standard, and Geberit have diversified to offer a wide range of toilet technologies and materials. Synthetic materials now predominate; piping is made of plastic and the “porcelain” is more likely to be polymer. Old and widely used lead piping has been condemned as a potential cause of poisoning. (Plumbing gets its name from plomb, the medieval word for lead, as plumbers were essentially lead workers.)
Plastic pipe is in wide use for domestic water supply and drain-waste-vent (DWV) pipe. Principal types include: Polyvinyl chloride (PVC) was produced experimentally in the 19th century but did not become practical to manufacture until 1926, when Waldo Semon of BF Goodrich Co. developed a method to plasticize PVC, making it easier to process. PVC pipe began to be manufactured in the 1940s and was in wide use for Drain-Waste-Vent piping during the reconstruction of Germany and Japan following WWII. In the 1950s, plastics manufacturers in Western Europe and Japan began producing acrylonitrile butadiene styrene (ABS) pipe. The method for producing cross-linked polyethylene (PEX) was also developed in the 1950s. Plastic supply pipes have become increasingly common, with a variety of materials and fittings employed.
New York Plumber's expert team will handle any home plumbing repair or plumbing fixture you may need: clogged drain, backflow, slab leaks, frozen pipes, solar water heater installation, basement flooding, leaking faucets, burst pipes, faulty garbage disposals, clogged sinks, leak detection, sump pump failure or any other plumbing repair service you may need - We do it all!

Master plumber: To become a master plumber, a person must have a certain number of years' experience as a journeyman plumber, in addition to an associate's degree or training at a vocational school. A master plumber must pass an exam that typically encompasses both written and practical knowledge. They must also complete continuing education hours every year. Oftentimes the business owner, a master plumber is subject to inspection and must make sure all journeyman plumbers working for his or her company are in compliance with plumbing regulations.


You may second guess that bacon grease going down the drain, but it seems a lot easier than trying to clean it out with a paper towel, right? Plumbers beg of you to have some patience, and instead of pouring it down the kitchen sink drain, allow it to harden, scrape it into a garbage can and wipe out the pan with the paper towel before washing. It will save you money in the long run. Here’s how to unclog a standard kitchen sink drain.
I was disappointed with the pressure of a tub and shower that were plumbed with 1/2 supply lines (2nd floor). Could be low pressure from the street, but I want to replace with 5/8. Plus, I'd like to have 2 back to back showers, one inside and one outside. So, I had intended to bring a 1 supply to both, then branch up to valves and shower head with 5/8. Finally, I thought pressure from the street was typically 55 to 70 psi and I am concerned if pvc can take that.Any thoughts?

Rooter Plumbing

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