An apprenticeship is the most common pathway to becoming a plumber. Many unions and businesses mandate that an apprentice receive a minimum of 246 hours of technical education, which could include instruction in math, applied physics and chemistry, and up to 2,000 hours of paid, practical training working with an experienced plumber. Safety training is also an important component of the process, since injuries are common in this line of work. "We have many hours worth of [Occupational Safety and Health Administration] training before we go on to a job site," says Patrick Kellett, the administrative assistant to the general president for the United Association of Journeymen and Apprentices of the Plumbing, Pipe Fitting Industry of the United States, Canada and Australia. "We're very conscious of the dangers that come with working in construction."

We have been cleaning drains in Phoenix, San Diego and the Inland Empire for over two decades. The most common drain clogs are kitchen sinks and main drain sewer stoppages, we have seen it all, and can take care of any clog you have. Most people don’t know there are several ways to clean a drain. Some homeowners will rent a drain snake in not knowing that we will clean your drain and provide you with a warranty for around the same cost!

Master plumbers on construction jobs may be involved with developing blueprints that show the placement of all the pipes and fixtures. Their input helps ensure that a structure’s plumbing meets building codes, stays within budget, and works well with the location of other features, such as electric wires. Many diagrams are now created digitally with the use of Building Information Modeling (BIM), which allows a building’s physical systems to be planned and coordinated across occupations.
Do you think you have a water leak in your house or business in Phoenix, San Diego and the Inland Empire? Does your floor feel hot? Have you noticed an unexpected increase in your Phoenix, San Diego and the Inland Empire water or gas bill? Our plumbers in Phoenix, San Diego and the Inland Empire are experts in the latest electronic leak detection technology.
If you decide to try this job yourself, be prepared to keep meticulous track of about a dozen tiny parts (put the stopper in the sink so none of them fall down the drain). There are many different faucet designs, so you may not be able to tell what to replace until you've done the disassembly. Whether you do it yourself or hire a plumber, this would be a good time to think about whether you want to upgrade the faucet with a new design.
Although plumbers, pipefitters, and steamfitters perform three distinct and specialized roles, their duties are often similar. For example, they all install pipes and fittings that carry water, steam, air, or other liquids or gases. They determine the necessary materials for a job, connect pipes, and perform pressure tests to ensure that a pipe system is airtight and watertight. Their tools include drills, saws, welding torches, and wrenches.
Over the past 10+ years, we’ve become one of the most trusted Phoenix plumbing companies in the Valley. We’ve built up this trust by adhering to a high level of excellence and working to complete every job the right way on the first visit out. Knowing that a job is done correctly the first time gives our customers a peace of mind, and it is an approach that has helped solidify our customers’ sense of trust in us.
Sump pumps are used to re-route water away from the lowest point of your home's foundation and protect your basement and easily damaged areas from flooding. In most cases, your sump pump is hardwired to your electrical system or possibly plugged into a wall outlet. Because these power sources can often fail in a storm when water damage occurs, sump pumps are typically equipped with battery backup power.
If you decide to try this job yourself, be prepared to keep meticulous track of about a dozen tiny parts (put the stopper in the sink so none of them fall down the drain). There are many different faucet designs, so you may not be able to tell what to replace until you've done the disassembly. Whether you do it yourself or hire a plumber, this would be a good time to think about whether you want to upgrade the faucet with a new design.

Our professional staff of qualified plumbers are highly familiar with New York City's unique plumbing structure, and we are here to provide each of our customers with the most professional and affordable plumbing service for any residential or commercial plumbing problems. Whether you are located in Manhattan, Queens, Bronx, Brooklyn, Staten Island or Westchester County - We are here 24/7 to handle any of your plumbing needs.


Bob Carter started as with plumbers Indianapolis and moved his family to Greenwood in the late 1960’s.  He continued to do plumbing in Indianapolis and soon became a plumber in Greenwood as well.  Fast forward to today… Carter’s My Plumber is a 3rd Generation, family-owned Plumbing business operating from Greenwood, and serving the Indianapolis metro area. Son, Jamie and Grandson, Kelson now run the family business.
“Don’t go to the Yellow Pages to find a plumber,” says Berkey’s Bill Stevens. “It’s like guessing lottery numbers. Anyone can make an appealing ad, but that doesn’t mean they are legitimate. In this industry, it’s easy for a plumber who develops a poor reputation to advertise under a different name. They come and go.” Even searching for someone online may end up being a scam using fake reviews. Instead, look for a plumber who is well-established in your community. Check the Better Business Bureau and read customer reviews at sites such as HomeAdvisor, Angie’s List, or Citysearch. Local contractors or plumbing fixture stores can also refer you to a quality plumber, according to Grady Daniel, who owns a plumbing company in Austin, Texas. “Most of these firms won’t work with bad plumbers.” Or simply ask your neighbors for a referral. A trusted plumber that consistently delivers quality service does not remain a secret for very long.

The word "plumber" dates from the Roman Empire.[3] The Latin for lead is plumbum. Roman roofs used lead in conduits and drain pipes[4] and some were also covered with lead, lead was also used for piping and for making baths.[5] In medieval times anyone who worked with lead was referred to as a plumber as can be seen from an extract of workmen fixing a roof in Westminster Palace and were referred to as plumbers "To Gilbert de Westminster, plumber, working about the roof of the pantry of the little hall, covering it with lead, and about various defects in the roof of the little hall".[6] Thus a person with expertise in working with lead was first known as a Plumbarius which was later shortened to plumber.


I just had my pipe under the sink unclogged  and new pipes put in $600.00, then they flushed out the pipe from under the sink to the outside pipe $700.00, Total of $1.600.00, I thought that the price was high, I got the plumber from Home Advisors, not sure they had to do all they did but they said I needed the work done.  The same evening hike using the dishwasher I had a leak in one of the pipes they put in, they came back the next day to fix it. Don't know if I will use them again.. They were K&D kitchens.
Scott was very knowledgeable and happy to test out all items of my finikie hot water heater. He called in tech support and tested pressures and did a vent pipe test to check air flow. How do I know this, because he explained everything to me. One afternoon with him, and I could be a tech. All joking aside. I appreciate the continued support of Atomic. Scott's professionalism and willingness to keep me in the loop is spot on. Thanks Scott.
It does help in regards to procedures and rules in order to better understand your options.  Obviously cost is always an issue and the size of the company probably determine the labor cost.  That is why some times people take chances with "others' hoping that there have good experience but because they are independent operators there pricing might be more flexible.
plumbing, piping systems inside buildings for water supply and sewage. The Romans had a highly developed plumbing system; water was brought to Rome by aqueducts and distributed to homes in lead pipes—hence the name plumbing from the Latin word plumbum for lead. During the Middle Ages, however, plumbing became almost nonexistent. In fact, London's first water system after the Middle Ages (c.1515) consisted partly of the rehabilitated Roman system; the rest was patterned after it. Modern plumbing began in the early 1800s, when steam engines became capable of supplying water under pressure and cheap cast iron pipes could be supplied to carry it. The common materials used today in water supply pipes are steel, copper, brass, plastic, and lead. Plumbing for sewage is made of cast iron, steel, asbestos cement, copper, and plastic. Water pressure is usually insufficient to supply the needs of tall apartment and office buildings; in such cases storage tanks are installed on the roof, into which a pump lifts water. The water then flows through the piping system of the building by gravity. Smaller buildings may have a pneumatic tank for the same purpose. The tank is partly filled with air, which is compressed when water is pumped in so that it will force water through the pipes. Sewage and drain systems typically have a trap, often a loop-shaped section of pipe, to seal off vapors in the pipes from the rest of the building. Vent pipes lead these vapors to the outside of the building; they also eliminate any suction in the piping and thus prevent the siphoning of water from traps when a nearby fixture discharges. In the 1970s and 80s flexible polybutylene plumbing was widely installed in standard and mobile homes. When unprecedented numbers of these plastic pipes began leaking because of exposure to chlorine and other chemicals in tap water, homeowners brought class-action lawsuits against the manufacturers, which were settled in 1995 for hundreds of millions of dollars.
Most large cities today pipe solid wastes to sewage treatment plants in order to separate and partially purify the water, before emptying into streams or other bodies of water. For potable water use, galvanized iron piping was commonplace in the United States from the late 1800s until around 1960. After that period, copper piping took over, first soft copper with flared fittings, then with rigid copper tubing utilizing soldered fittings.
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