Plumbing problems will hit you like a ton of bricks at any moment and create an emergency plumbing problem. Home owners and businesses will, at some point, have to call a plumber. We have a live operator that works for us and that will answer your call personally… not an answering service. When the time comes and you need a plumber, which is why your on this page, we currently have these locations to serve you: Phoenix, San Diego, and the Inland Empire Region. 24 hours a day 7 days a week, we are ready to go. We understand you have many Plumbing companies to choose from. Do a little homework and make sure they are licensed and offer warranties on the work they perform. We have you covered on both!
Specialized plumbing tools include pipe wrenches, flaring pliers, pipe vise, pipe bending machine, pipe cutter, dies, and joining tools such as soldering torches and crimp tools. New tools have been developed to help plumbers fix problems more efficiently. For example, plumbers use video cameras for inspections of hidden leaks or problems, they use hydro jets, and high pressure hydraulic pumps connected to steel cables for trench-less sewer line replacement.
My hot water heater ruptured at 2030 on a Tuesday and Justin along with Trey were at my house at 0830 the next morning. They were consummate professionals the entire time they were in my garage. They were courteous and polite and worked as hard as they could on a difficult removal and replacement. I can't thank them and Atomic Pluming enough. I'll call them for anything in the future and you should too!
If you have a major fix in your home, it’s important to shop around for a plumber to do the work. At least three bids will help you determine the range of the project, so you can weigh the pros and cons of price and the reputation of the plumbers. Get references and contact them. Also, a good plumber isn’t likely to nickel and dime you. For the smaller jobs, check out these 11 plumbing tricks.
A conventional water heater is recognized as a cylindrical storage tank ranging in size from 20 to 80 gallons in capacity. This tank is typically insulated with one or two elements that heat the water to the temperature set on the thermostat. Conventional water heaters have been used for decades in residential and commercial buildings. However, this method of constantly heating or keeping the tank of water hot is not very energy efficient, especially if you don’t have a need for hot water 24 hours a day.
plumbing, piping systems inside buildings for water supply and sewage. The Romans had a highly developed plumbing system; water was brought to Rome by aqueducts and distributed to homes in lead pipes—hence the name plumbing from the Latin word plumbum for lead. During the Middle Ages, however, plumbing became almost nonexistent. In fact, London's first water system after the Middle Ages (c.1515) consisted partly of the rehabilitated Roman system; the rest was patterned after it. Modern plumbing began in the early 1800s, when steam engines became capable of supplying water under pressure and cheap cast iron pipes could be supplied to carry it. The common materials used today in water supply pipes are steel, copper, brass, plastic, and lead. Plumbing for sewage is made of cast iron, steel, asbestos cement, copper, and plastic. Water pressure is usually insufficient to supply the needs of tall apartment and office buildings; in such cases storage tanks are installed on the roof, into which a pump lifts water. The water then flows through the piping system of the building by gravity. Smaller buildings may have a pneumatic tank for the same purpose. The tank is partly filled with air, which is compressed when water is pumped in so that it will force water through the pipes. Sewage and drain systems typically have a trap, often a loop-shaped section of pipe, to seal off vapors in the pipes from the rest of the building. Vent pipes lead these vapors to the outside of the building; they also eliminate any suction in the piping and thus prevent the siphoning of water from traps when a nearby fixture discharges. In the 1970s and 80s flexible polybutylene plumbing was widely installed in standard and mobile homes. When unprecedented numbers of these plastic pipes began leaking because of exposure to chlorine and other chemicals in tap water, homeowners brought class-action lawsuits against the manufacturers, which were settled in 1995 for hundreds of millions of dollars.
I was disappointed with the pressure of a tub and shower that were plumbed with 1/2 supply lines (2nd floor). Could be low pressure from the street, but I want to replace with 5/8. Plus, I'd like to have 2 back to back showers, one inside and one outside. So, I had intended to bring a 1 supply to both, then branch up to valves and shower head with 5/8. Finally, I thought pressure from the street was typically 55 to 70 psi and I am concerned if pvc can take that.Any thoughts?

Rooter Plumbing

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