PLUMBING. Plumbing is the system that supplies, distributes, uses, and removes water from a building. Among the components used in the system are pipes, fittings, sinks, basins, faucets, valves, drains, toilets, and tubs. In colonial America, water used for cleaning or cooking was typically brought into a building by bucket and the wastewater was later removed in the same way. Elimination, for the most part, tended to take place out-side in a privy or outhouse. Although there were rare isolated examples of indoor toilets and running water based on or using English and European technology, it was not until the mid-nineteenth century that there were an appreciable number of plumbing installations. For many households they amounted to nothing more than a hand pump and kitchen sink. For a far smaller number it also might be hot and cold running water and what early on became known as the bathroom. During the 1840s and 1850s, the major elements of the bath were in place and consisted simply of a water closet or toilet and a "bathtub." Light washing still took place at the bedroom wash-stand with its basin, water pitcher, and slop jar or bucket. It was not until the 1860s that these items began to be replaced gradually by basins, faucets, and running water installed in the bathroom.
Where plumbing had been a mostly locally regulated matter for most of its history, the federal government became involved in the early 1990s. Until the 1950s, toilets generally used five or more gallons per flush (GPF). During the decades that followed, the plumbing industry reduced the standard volume for toilet flush tanks to 3.5 gallons. A further reduction in volume resulted from the Energy Policy Act of 1992, which in the name of conservation mandated that all new toilets made in the United States must use no more than 1.6 GPF. The same legislation also regulated the flow in shower heads and faucets. Although the first low-flow toilets proved un-satisfactory and were met with public disapproval, redesigned equipment employing new technology has removed most objections.
Bob Carter started as with plumbers Indianapolis and moved his family to Greenwood in the late 1960’s.  He continued to do plumbing in Indianapolis and soon became a plumber in Greenwood as well.  Fast forward to today… Carter’s My Plumber is a 3rd Generation, family-owned Plumbing business operating from Greenwood, and serving the Indianapolis metro area. Son, Jamie and Grandson, Kelson now run the family business.
Nationally, the average water heater repair cost ranges between $120 and $200, although prices can range up to $400 or more. Water heater repair costs will depend on the type of water heater you have (tankless, electric, natural gas, etc.), the source of the problem, the cost for new parts, and labor rates in your area. Common water heater issues include problems with the thermocouple, thermostat, heating element and leaks. Most standard electric water heaters have two thermostats and two elements. One example for the cost to replace a bad thermostat is $185 for parts and labor. Replacing both the thermostat and the heating element could cost approximately $150-$200. The thermocouple is a safety device that senses when the pilot light is burning and signals the gas valve to close if the pilot light goes out. If your thermocouple is bad or corroded, the average cost to clean and repair it could be between $350 and $400. If your water heater has started to leak, it is usually more cost-effective to invest in a new water heater than to repair it, unless you’re covered by a warranty.

Try a plunger: If it's a double sink, use a wet rag or rubber stopper to block the other drain. Place the plunger directly over the drain until it forms an air-tight seal. If you have trouble forming an air-tight seal with the plunger, run it under some hot water to make it more flexible. Move the plunger up and down to dislodge the clog from the drain.


Those who attempted to bring plumbing indoors faced technical as well as attitudinal challenges. Decisions on how wastewater was removed required as much concern as those made to ensure an adequate water supply. But equally vexing was the prevailing miasma theory of disease, which held that illnesses stemmed from "bad air" that was readily identifiable by its offensive odor. This led to a distrust of early indoor plumbing that tended to leak and a deadly fear of the sewer gas that accompanied the leaks. It is no wonder then that many individuals maintained a strong belief that elimination was best taken care of out of doors.

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