The difference between pipes and tubes is simply in the way it is sized. PVC pipe for plumbing applications and galvanized steel pipe for instance, are measured in IPS (iron pipe size). Copper tube, CPVC, PeX and other tubing is measured nominally, which is basically an average diameter. These sizing schemes allow for universal adaptation of transitional fittings. For instance, 1/2" PeX tubing is the same size as 1/2" copper tubing. 1/2" PVC on the other hand is not the same size as 1/2" tubing, and therefore requires either a threaded male or female adapter to connect them. When used in agricultural irrigation, the singular form "pipe" is often used as a plural.[19]

We have been fixing slab leaks in Phoenix, San Diego and the Inland Empire for decades. A common plumbing problem in Phoenix, San Diego and the Inland Empire is when there is a leak under the floor and you may find a hot or warm spot in you home. Plumbers refer to this as a slab leak because it usually occurs under a slab of concrete, whether it’s a sidewalk, patio, or a leak under the foundation.p>

I am not a plumber, but I am familiar with oxidation.  Many simple plumbing valves only need to be removed and new "O" rings installed.  That's where the problem comes in.  Most older homes used metal pipes and not PVC.  Usually the valve screws into a different type of metal and oxidation occurs between the two metals, almost becoming one.  In order to get the valve stem out you have to break it loose.  If you break the pipe, not only do you have a mess but then you have to pay to fix it.  Simple if you break it you pay.  If a plumber breaks it, he is responsible.  I recommend paying the plumbers fee and save yourselves headaches in the long run. 

Flexible plastic tubing can be used to circulate hot water below your home’s flooring. This is known as hydronic heating. The water/liquid is stored in a boiler and pushed into a plumbing manifold so that it can be properly circulated throughout your home floors as designed. While this is a very beneficial way to radiate heat through your floors during colder seasons, hydronic heating can develop some serious problems that require plumbing repair.
Experiencing low water pressure problems? Low water pressure in Phoenix, San Diego and the Inland Empire is a frustrating issue. Our experienced local plumbers in Phoenix, San Diego and the Inland Empire have years of experience fixing low water pressure problems. Call us today to get your Phoenix, San Diego and the Inland Empire low water pressure problem fixed today at a price that is reasonable and with service that is dependable and.
Whether you’re in the market for a gas, electric, tankless, or high-efficiency water heater, we can help you get it fast. We offer same-day water heater installation so you can enjoy your new water heater as soon as possible. If you call us by 3:00 p.m., we’ll have your water heater up and running by the end of the day; call after 3:00 p.m. and we’ll make sure it gets done the next day.
I thought that my sump pump had ended its life and needed to be replaced. The contractor I found through Home Adviser came out the following day and arrived reasonably promptly.  The technician tested the pump and it wasn't responding. He then checked the  breaker panel and all seemed well. However he checked to see if power was reaching the outlet, it wasn't so he tripped some breakers and reset them and the power to my pump came on and the pump works so a replacement wasn't necessary. He charged $75.00 which I think was reasonable for a call-out fee and time spent.

Jimmy P removed a 6 inch diameter root that had grown around my main water line. He was diligent in finding our the cause of the leak, kept me informed throughout the process and made sure that I was up and running with water for my family in less than an 8 hour period. It was a huge undertaking. Jimmy P was first class and polite . The had the necessary experience that was needed to get this water main break under control. He made the best of a horrible situation. Extremely pleasant and talented. I would highly suggest that all of my friends request Jimmy P at ATOMIC!
I was disappointed with the pressure of a tub and shower that were plumbed with 1/2 supply lines (2nd floor). Could be low pressure from the street, but I want to replace with 5/8. Plus, I'd like to have 2 back to back showers, one inside and one outside. So, I had intended to bring a 1 supply to both, then branch up to valves and shower head with 5/8. Finally, I thought pressure from the street was typically 55 to 70 psi and I am concerned if pvc can take that.Any thoughts?

Rooter Plumbing

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