Our Water Heater failed and flooded our attic on the weekend. They answered the phone and had someone out the same day. By the next day, we had a new water heater installed and hot water, all over the weekend. They were quick and professional. Justin D answered all my questions and took the time to explain. When speaking to Justin it was clear that he cared and was well trained in customer experience. Thank you all for making a stressful situation a little easier to deal with. We appreciate your services.
“Intelligent Service replaced our two sump pumps, added digital float switches, and installed a digital wall unit to track the water levels and pump options. They also checked our existing battery backup for battery outputs. They improved the piping and fixed the check valves. They cleaned the sump pit and the work area. They did a terrific job. Will definitely use them again and will recommend them as well. Pleasure to work with, very responsive, knowledgeable staff, and did a good job explaining the work order prior to writing up the estimate.”
HOT WATER HEATER REPAIR AND INSTALATION Option One Plumbers in Phoenix, San Diego and the Inland Empire do installs, repairs, or replacements of all types of water heaters including electric, natural gas, propane, and tankless for both residential and commercial uses. We are your local water heater Phoenix, San Diego and the Inland Empire experts and have been servicing water heaters for decades.
I thought that my sump pump had ended its life and needed to be replaced. The contractor I found through Home Adviser came out the following day and arrived reasonably promptly.  The technician tested the pump and it wasn't responding. He then checked the  breaker panel and all seemed well. However he checked to see if power was reaching the outlet, it wasn't so he tripped some breakers and reset them and the power to my pump came on and the pump works so a replacement wasn't necessary. He charged $75.00 which I think was reasonable for a call-out fee and time spent.
Ryan arrived right on time and was very cordial and friendly. He got right to work and provided me a very thorough description of the things that needed attention, and subsequently provided pricing for each of the requested service options and the extras that were also identified. He really did a great job and we were extremely satisfied. I recommended your company to a friend yesterday, and will definitely continue to use and recommend your company for future plumbing needs!Bravo Zulu Ryan.
Len The Plumber is a full service plumbing and drain cleaning company serving the entire Baltimore, Washington D.C., Northern Virginia, Delaware and the Philadelphia Area as well as Anne Arundel, Baltimore, Carroll, Cecil, Harford, Howard, Montgomery, Prince George’s, Charles, Fairfax, Alexandria, Arlington, Loudoun, Prince William, Falls Church, Manassas, Delaware, Chester, New Castle, and Stafford counties. We are continuing to grow and expand our service areas so please continue to check-in to see if we are in your area and always feel free to call if you have a question. Our service area map shows all the counties and district that we currently serve.
Homes have many combustion appliances, such as stoves, water heaters, fireplaces, furnaces, and boilers. Without proper ventilation, these appliances can create harmful gases such as carbon monoxide. Adequate ventilation is absolutely necessary in any home. For example, exhaust fans can play a pivotal role in clearing out harmful gases in bathrooms, cooking areas, and garages. They can keep the air clear of harmful moisture and fumes, while increasing your comfort by keeping humidity levels low.
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We live in a recently completed townhouse that was built with double-wall construction. That construction method was touted by the builder as what would keep sound from penetrating between the units. But we can hear the next door neighbors' TV and stereo, and sometimes voices and even snoring, through the wall. While sometimes it's the volume, mostly it's the bass sounds coming through the wall. They say they don't hear us, but we keep our bass turned down. They crank up the bass, and they are not going to change that. They also are not going to do anything construction-wise to help from their side. What is the best way for us to try to block the low frequency/bass sounds from penetrating the existing wall into our side?
Several of the nation's larger cities were providing water to their residents during the first decade of the nineteenth century, but only infrequently was water actually brought into homes. City-provided water was used in large part to fight fires and flush streets. Household water was most likely taken from a tap located outside of the house or a common hydrant. For those not connected to city mains, and even some who were, there were still other ways to obtain water. If a stream was not near by, there was rain runoff from a roof. It could be collected in one or more tanks located in out-of-the-way places in a house and feed the plumbing system through gravity.
When a person has a blockage in their sewage system they often try to fix it themselves by adding an acid or a base such as Drano in an attempt to dissolve or dislodge the problem. These chemicals can get into the plumbers eyes [14]when the sewage is splashed during the repair. The plumbers skin during the repair does come into contact with the sewage water.[15] The owner of the toilet might not report to the plumber they have already tried Drano a highly caustic base .
While in the past, mains drainage and indoor plumbing were a sign of modernity, today people want “designer” bathrooms, luxury fixtures, power showers, fitted kitchens, and the latest technology. There has been a “restroom revolution” in Asia in particular, with companies such as Toto producing complete prefabricated bathroom units for the Japanese housing market, all the components being made together. Colored polyester resins, modern plastics, and marble and granite composites feature strongly in these modern bathroom modules (Greed 2003). Likewise, modern automatic public toilets are fully integrated, prefabricated systems that often use stainless steel and pathogen-resistant polymer materials. However, user-end toilet innovation must be matched by provider-end infrastructural sewerage system provision. The functionality of domestic toilets is dependent on there being a working sewerage system to take away output. Alternatively, the output from a luxury bathroom, as is the case in some affluent areas in developing countries, might end up in a cesspool under the house for collection by traditional night-soil operatives. Alternatively, as in some parts of the Americas and Australasia, even upmarket private houses are not served by a municipal sewerage and drainage system, and depend upon their own cesspits, generators, and water tanks.
Plumbing reached its early apex in ancient Rome, which saw the introduction of expansive systems of aqueducts, tile wastewater removal, and widespread use of lead pipes. With the Fall of Rome both water supply and sanitation stagnated—or regressed—for well over 1,000 years. Improvement was very slow, with little effective progress made until the growth of modern densely populated cities in the 1800s. During this period, public health authorities began pressing for better waste disposal systems to be installed, to prevent or control epidemics of disease. Earlier, the waste disposal system had merely consisted of collecting waste and dumping it on the ground or into a river. Eventually the development of separate, underground water and sewage systems eliminated open sewage ditches and cesspools.
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