The movement of liquids and gases through pipes is critical to modern life. In homes, water is needed for both drinking and sanitation. In factories, chemicals are moved to aid in product manufacturing. In power plants, steam is moved to drive turbines that generate electricity. Plumbers, pipefitters, and steamfitters install and repair these pipe systems.
A company may charge approximately $1,000 to replace a 50-gallon tank-style electric water heater (not including any upgrades required by building codes). Replacing a gas-powered water heater might cost $1,100 (not including code upgrades). Some companies roll the disposal of an old heater into the overall cost of the new water heater installation. Other professionals charge an additional removal fee that can range from $35 to $150.
Cold water alerted us that something was wrong with our 10 year old water heater. We called Atomic Plumbing on a Saturday evening and they had appointments available the very next morning! The ladies answering the phones were incredible and the system they have in place to alert you when your technician will be coming is top notch (including a picture and information about your technician in e-mail form). We found our technician, Randy, to be honest, professional and incredibly talented. He diagnosed our problem in a short amount of time, gave us several reasonable options and was able to give us a brand new water heater the next day for a great rate. Cannot say enough good things about Atomic Plumbing & Drain Cleaning and will definitely be using them in the future!
I had 207 Plumbing come to fix a leak in my ceiling.  It's a terrible, terrible company to do business with.  He came and fixed a broken pipe in the ceiling, and I asked him to check the rest of the pipe to make sure that nothing else was broken, he said everything was OK and charged me $219.00 for 45 minutes and left.  Never cleaned up his mess.  I went to clean up the mess after he left and found there was more damage to the pipe.  I called him to come back, which he did.  He looked at the water coming down from the ceiling, into a light fixture and said he had another job to go to and couldn't come back until next week.  He also wanted to charge me $350.00 to come back.  I told him that was too much and he said he would make an exception and only charge me $219.00.  Now I have major damage done to the ceiling, the light fixture and the floor.  All of this could have been prevented if he had stayed and fixed the problem.  I will NOT hire him again.
 CON'T FROM COMMENTS EARLIER.  However,  the  installation took less than 3/4/ hour and was a basic regulator with no other function.  Looking up the price afterwards, invoice did not list type or price, it appears that it would have cost me around $60 for the regulator and another $15 or so for the additional supplies necessary to install it and it was really a rather simple job with easy access.    Given that, it seems that $300 for less that  an hours worth of on site work,  company says it does not include commute time in its prices, is a little high.  While flat rate quotes are nice, they must take into consideration situations where the work load differs depending on the circumstances.  Therefore, unless you are at the upper end of the harder work needed than the average job. it can be argued that my estimated price of $300 for labor was more than a little high.  Maybe I am wrong since I have not used their services for years and  am not knowledgeable of the costs of equipment and professional labor today.  
One who fixes or repairs pipes. Plumber has a "b" in it because pipes were originally made of lead, (lead seemed a logical choice at the time, because of its resiliancy against rust... then people discovered what lead poisening was, and rust no longer seemed so bad!) and lead's abbreviation on the periodic table is pb (derived from its latin name).
Using corrosive chemicals to dissolve a clog is like throwing a grenade down a gopher hole. Instead, Wroblewski recommends flushing your drains weekly with a half cup of baking soda and one cup of vinegar. Let it fizz in the drain for ten minutes, then pour in four cups of boiling water. Find out about the plumbing nightmares that will make you cringe.

Bob Carter started as with plumbers Indianapolis and moved his family to Greenwood in the late 1960’s.  He continued to do plumbing in Indianapolis and soon became a plumber in Greenwood as well.  Fast forward to today… Carter’s My Plumber is a 3rd Generation, family-owned Plumbing business operating from Greenwood, and serving the Indianapolis metro area. Son, Jamie and Grandson, Kelson now run the family business.

Rooter Plumbing Co

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