For details about apprenticeship or other opportunities in this occupation, contact the offices of the state employment service; the state apprenticeship agency; local plumbing, heating, and cooling contractors or firms that employ fitters; or local union–management apprenticeship committees. Apprenticeship information is available from the U.S. Department of Labor's Apprenticeship program online, or by phone at 877-872-5627.

Over the past 10+ years, we’ve become one of the most trusted Phoenix plumbing companies in the Valley. We’ve built up this trust by adhering to a high level of excellence and working to complete every job the right way on the first visit out. Knowing that a job is done correctly the first time gives our customers a peace of mind, and it is an approach that has helped solidify our customers’ sense of trust in us.


Selecting the right plumbing service isn’t easy. To receive the quality assistance you deserve, trust Best Plumbing. The highly-trained and informed plumbers at Best Plumbing are prepared to handle any and every commercial and residential need. You can count on us for all your drain cleaning, water heater, plumbing installation and sewer services needs. Why should you choose our company over others?
Plumbing reached its early apex in ancient Rome, which saw the introduction of expansive systems of aqueducts, tile wastewater removal, and widespread use of lead pipes. With the Fall of Rome both water supply and sanitation stagnated—or regressed—for well over 1,000 years. Improvement was very slow, with little effective progress made until the growth of modern densely populated cities in the 1800s. During this period, public health authorities began pressing for better waste disposal systems to be installed, to prevent or control epidemics of disease. Earlier, the waste disposal system had merely consisted of collecting waste and dumping it on the ground or into a river. Eventually the development of separate, underground water and sewage systems eliminated open sewage ditches and cesspools.
The word "plumber" dates from the Roman Empire.[3] The Latin for lead is plumbum. Roman roofs used lead in conduits and drain pipes[4] and some were also covered with lead, lead was also used for piping and for making baths.[5] In medieval times anyone who worked with lead was referred to as a plumber as can be seen from an extract of workmen fixing a roof in Westminster Palace and were referred to as plumbers "To Gilbert de Westminster, plumber, working about the roof of the pantry of the little hall, covering it with lead, and about various defects in the roof of the little hall".[6] Thus a person with expertise in working with lead was first known as a Plumbarius which was later shortened to plumber.
The introduction of the first water-retaining traps or seals in the 1850s, and the common use of "U"-shaped traps in the 1870s, were major steps forward. The design of the trap ensured that enough water remained in it to effectively block the passage of sewer gas back through the plumbing fixtures. During the 1870s vent pipes were introduced. They not only carried sewer gas out of the system, but also broke the suction created by movement of liquid in the pipes and eliminated the possibility of siphoning water that sealed the traps.
According to standards set by the federal government, a low-flow showerhead uses no more than 2.5 gallons of water per minute at a water pressure of 80 pounds per square inch. That’s less than half the rate of water used by some older traditional showerhead models. Low-flow showerheads come in two main types, aerating, which creates a mist, or laminar-flow that sends water out in a steady stream.

We have an outstanding reputation with the community and several water sanitation districts. We have an “A” rating with the BBB. We have been nominated for Angie’s list for many years in a row. You will never get an answering service when you call our company. You will reach the owners. The owner’s founded this plumbing company upon the idea of providing exceptional plumbing services for a fair and honest price. See details of our service guarantee
Yes I do know what approximately the part is and how much but the problem is  almost all plumbers & even electricians want $100 service call.  That's ridiculous as if the part is $25 that $125 to me and that's too much but I see they want the $$$$ so they start with a service call. Example my outdoor light bulb broke and I couldn't get it out of socket.  I had to call electrician.  Yes, $100 service call, handed me the bulb and I gave him a new one to put it and that was it. Took him all of 10 min.  So now I hesitate when I need something done in these fields and thank goodness so far I'm not in need of anything..
Hello I had a plumber do an estimate for me to replace our copper pipes with plastic as we have no existing walls up in our basement yet...pretty basic job... so we figured we could upgrade as we do live in Northern Ontario and it does tend to get quite cold here in the winters.  We dont have any existing problems with our plumbing right now just figured it would be good time to do the job and perhaps change the pipes to 3 quarter inch for faster flow.  Well I never thought in all my life I would get an estimate back that would state $350.00 an hour in labor...yes that is correct $350.00 an hour...estimated 10 hours for the job to be completed.  So he quoted me $3500.00 for labor alone.. not supplies?  Well needless to say I will be happy with my half inch copper pipes and will happily wait for my bathtub to fill up at a slower pace.  Just wanted to know what your thoughts are on this $350.00 an hour quote?  Thank you and enjoy your day.
I was disappointed with the pressure of a tub and shower that were plumbed with 1/2 supply lines (2nd floor). Could be low pressure from the street, but I want to replace with 5/8. Plus, I'd like to have 2 back to back showers, one inside and one outside. So, I had intended to bring a 1 supply to both, then branch up to valves and shower head with 5/8. Finally, I thought pressure from the street was typically 55 to 70 psi and I am concerned if pvc can take that.Any thoughts?

Rooter Plumbing

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