"lead hung on a string to show the vertical line," early 14c., from Old French *plombe, plomee "sounding lead," and directly from Late Latin *plumba, originally plural of Latin plumbum "lead (the metal), lead ball; pipe; pencil," a word of unknown origin, related to Greek molybdos "lead" (dialectal bolimos) and perhaps from an extinct Mediterranean language, perhaps Iberian.
Hi Kenneth, We would be happy to get you connected with a pro for your project. You can submit a service request on our website: http://www.homeadvisor.com/, or browse reviews for local water heater pros here: http://www.homeadvisor.com/c.html. We can also have a project advisor reach out to assist you if you send your contact information to [email protected] –HASupport
Called Atomic plumbing after kitchen was flooded with water the evening before, was given a time a technician would be out. Technician Jimmy Powell showed up early and after checking problem He went right to work. He stated he would have to cut a hole in the ceiling to get to the the drain. After some careful measurements his cut was right on target. Jimmy fixed the problem and was a true professional from start to finish. I wouldn't hesitate to call Atomic Plumbing for any plumbing needs, and would highly recommend Jimmy Powell as the technician.

Compartmentalization of production was marked by separate metal-manufacture companies specializing in lead piping, plumbing fixtures, and other nonporcelain components. Nowadays, international toilet companies such as Armitage Shanks, Ideal Standard, and Geberit have diversified to offer a wide range of toilet technologies and materials. Synthetic materials now predominate; piping is made of plastic and the “porcelain” is more likely to be polymer. Old and widely used lead piping has been condemned as a potential cause of poisoning. (Plumbing gets its name from plomb, the medieval word for lead, as plumbers were essentially lead workers.)
The Carter Family grew up on the Southside of Indianapolis in the town of Greenwood. Bob Carter started as plumbers Indianapolis.  Jamie and Kelson have built the business as plumbers in Greenwood, and as they have grown the business to provide service to all Indianapolis, and the surrounding communities. Their Greenwood Plumbing company has been built on family values, and attention to detail in their workmanship. Customer Service & Satisfaction is a high priority, providing excellent work by Licensed Plumbers, along with standing behind this work with extended warranties. The Carter Family is dedicated to serving the community by volunteering, and donating to those in need.
The Carter Family grew up on the Southside of Indianapolis in the town of Greenwood. Bob Carter started as plumbers Indianapolis.  Jamie and Kelson have built the business as plumbers in Greenwood, and as they have grown the business to provide service to all Indianapolis, and the surrounding communities. Their Greenwood Plumbing company has been built on family values, and attention to detail in their workmanship. Customer Service & Satisfaction is a high priority, providing excellent work by Licensed Plumbers, along with standing behind this work with extended warranties. The Carter Family is dedicated to serving the community by volunteering, and donating to those in need.
We had a Saturday evening before Easter emergency when our water heater began leaking. We got the water turned off and contacted Atomic Plumbing. Their friendly appointment person told us they would have someone here the next morning, Easter! Jim came at 11 am and told us it would be best to replace it. We told him to go ahead. They went out and got a high quality one as we requested and installed it in a few hours. Very professional and kept us informed along the way. We appreciate Atomic Plumbing.
Both public and domestic toilet design is becoming increasingly technologically driven, with automatic flushes and sensor-controlled washing-and-drying facilities becoming commonplace. In parallel, environmental sustainability requirements to save water have resulted in a range of dual-flush cisterns, waterless urinals, and human-waste recycling innovations. High levels of toilet provision in every home, along with highly developed sewerage systems, are no longer necessarily seen as signs of progress and economic development. Such assumptions are now being questioned. Many parts of the world are not economically or environmentally in a position to build modern, expensive water and sewerage systems: It is not a high priority. Water is becoming an increasingly expensive and scarce resource; some see it as “the new oil” in terms of future geopolitical tensions. Far from being a sign of economic development, many see the emphasis upon water-based sewerage systems and flushing toilets as old fashioned, colonial, and unsustainable. Instead, new, more sustainable solutions are being developed, especially within prosperous advanced Asian countries that can afford such research. Such systems will incorporate the most modern technological and scientific advances in the fields of engineering, pathogen control, and urban governance (Chun 2002; Mara 2006).
Our mission is to give something back to the community in appreciation for the community's support of our business. Whether it’s through Atlanta’s Professional sports team, High and Middle Schools, local sports teams or home town events, we love coming out and enjoying and supporting the communities that have helped make us the company that we are. 
DoItYourself.com®, founded in 1995, is the leading independent home improvement and repair website. We welcome your comments and suggestions. All information is provided "AS IS." Website operating problems contact [email protected] Questions of a Do It Yourself nature should be submitted to our "DoItYourself.com Community Forums". Copyright © 1995-2018 MH Sub I, LLC dba Internet Brands. All rights reserved. You may freely link to this site, and use it for non-commercial use subject to our terms of use. View our Privacy Policy here.
 CON'T FROM COMMENTS EARLIER.  However,  the  installation took less than 3/4/ hour and was a basic regulator with no other function.  Looking up the price afterwards, invoice did not list type or price, it appears that it would have cost me around $60 for the regulator and another $15 or so for the additional supplies necessary to install it and it was really a rather simple job with easy access.    Given that, it seems that $300 for less that  an hours worth of on site work,  company says it does not include commute time in its prices, is a little high.  While flat rate quotes are nice, they must take into consideration situations where the work load differs depending on the circumstances.  Therefore, unless you are at the upper end of the harder work needed than the average job. it can be argued that my estimated price of $300 for labor was more than a little high.  Maybe I am wrong since I have not used their services for years and  am not knowledgeable of the costs of equipment and professional labor today.  
Average Americans work well into their 60s, so workers might as well have a job that’s enjoyable and a career that's fulfilling. A job with a low stress level, good work-life balance and solid prospects to improve, get promoted and earn a higher salary would make many employees happy. Here's how Plumbers job satisfaction is rated in terms of upward mobility, stress level and flexibility.
Option One Plumbing & Rooter is now offering commercial hydro jetting in Phoenix, San Diego and the Inland Empire to our residential customers. Our process utilizes high-pressure water to effectively cut tree roots and emulsify grease. Sewer jetting is the application of streams of high-pressure water for use within pipes for cleaning & debris removal. Our experienced hydro jet plumbers in Phoenix, San Diego and the Inland Empire are local experts and all of work comes with a warranty.
Beginning in the 1950s plastic pipe, most notably that made of polyvinyl chloride, has been used in ever increasing amounts. In the following decades, other plastics were introduced into pipe manufacture. However, by the last years of the century a number of plastic-pipe failures had occurred. Problems were attributed to defective manufacture and, in some cases, a chemical reaction taking place between the material used to make the pipe and chlorine in the water that it carried. These events led to class action lawsuits and a general reevaluation of the use of this inexpensive and easily worked alternative piping material.

PLUMBING. Plumbing is the system that supplies, distributes, uses, and removes water from a building. Among the components used in the system are pipes, fittings, sinks, basins, faucets, valves, drains, toilets, and tubs. In colonial America, water used for cleaning or cooking was typically brought into a building by bucket and the wastewater was later removed in the same way. Elimination, for the most part, tended to take place out-side in a privy or outhouse. Although there were rare isolated examples of indoor toilets and running water based on or using English and European technology, it was not until the mid-nineteenth century that there were an appreciable number of plumbing installations. For many households they amounted to nothing more than a hand pump and kitchen sink. For a far smaller number it also might be hot and cold running water and what early on became known as the bathroom. During the 1840s and 1850s, the major elements of the bath were in place and consisted simply of a water closet or toilet and a "bathtub." Light washing still took place at the bedroom wash-stand with its basin, water pitcher, and slop jar or bucket. It was not until the 1860s that these items began to be replaced gradually by basins, faucets, and running water installed in the bathroom.
Plumbing originated during ancient civilizations such as the Greek, Roman, Persian, Indian, and Chinese cities as they developed public baths and needed to provide potable water and wastewater removal, for larger numbers of people.[6] Standardized earthen plumbing pipes with broad flanges making use of asphalt for preventing leakages appeared in the urban settlements of the Indus Valley Civilization by 2700 BC.[7] The Romans used lead pipe inscriptions to prevent water theft. The word "plumber" dates from the Roman Empire.[8] The Latin for lead is plumbum. Roman roofs used lead in conduits and drain pipes[9] and some were also covered with lead. Lead was also used for piping and for making baths.[10]
×