Galvanized steel potable water supply and distribution pipes are commonly found with nominal pipe sizes from 3⁄8 inch (9.5 mm) to 2 inches (51 mm). It is rarely used today for new construction residential plumbing. Steel pipe has National Pipe Thread (NPT) standard tapered male threads, which connect with female tapered threads on elbows, tees, couplers, valves, and other fittings. Galvanized steel (often known simply as "galv" or "iron" in the plumbing trade) is relatively expensive, and difficult to work with due to weight and requirement of a pipe threader. It remains in common use for repair of existing "galv" systems and to satisfy building code non-combustibility requirements typically found in hotels, apartment buildings and other commercial applications. It is also extremely durable and resistant to mechanical abuse. Black lacquered steel pipe is the most widely used pipe material for fire sprinklers and natural gas.
Several types of pipe were used during the nineteenth century. With little or no knowledge of its possible long-term harmful effects, lead pipe was widely used. Its low price and the ease with which it could be formed and joined made it the material of choice for many installations. Iron, brass, and copper pipe were used as well. It was not unusual for a structure to be plumbed with several types of pipe, each used where it was most suited. But by the early twentieth century there was a move away from lead piping. The basic elements of domestic plumbing, in both the kitchen and bathroom, were in place by the 1890s. Changes since that time have been primarily aesthetic and in the materials used. During the second half of the twentieth century, tubs and basins that previously had been made of glazed ceramic or enameled iron, and much of the pipe manufactured in the United States as well, were being made of plastic.
Present-day water-supply systems use a network of high-pressure pumps, and pipes in buildings are now made of copper,[25] brass, plastic (particularly cross-linked polyethylene called PEX, which is estimated to be used in 60% of single-family homes[26]), or other nontoxic material. Due to its toxicity, most cities moved away from lead water-supply piping by the 1920s in the United States,[27] although lead pipes were approved by national plumbing codes into the 1980s,[28] and lead was used in plumbing solder for drinking water until it was banned in 1986.[27] Drain and vent lines are made of plastic, steel, cast-iron, or lead.[29][30]
Cast iron and ductile iron pipe was long a lower-cost alternative to copper, before the advent of durable plastic materials but special non-conductive fittings must be used where transitions are to be made to other metallic pipes, except for terminal fittings, in order to avoid corrosion owing to electrochemical reactions between dissimilar metals (see galvanic cell).[17]
Once again it was Atomic Plumbing to the rescue. This company is absolutely the best plumbing company in the whole area. This time I had James M and Ryan S complete a very complicated, long re-piping/re-routing of my gas line to the hot water heater and furnace. The gas company had found a leak and had to “red tag”/cut off my gas until the leak was repaired. I called Atomic and as always I received the very best service. Tiffany answered the phone and was so personable, warm, and reassuring. She quickly scheduled the repair. James M and Ryan S arrived on time and got to work. James was lead tech and fully explained the job and then he and his apprentice got to work. Both James and Ryan worked diligently and hard all day to complete the work. To cut to the chase, the work was approved by the city inspector and the gas company turned my gas back on. I was so relieved that what I thought might be a nightmare was handled so professsionally and promptly. Oh yes, the gas company tech actually complimented the work done by James M and Ryan S. I am so grateful to both of them for their hard work, their obvious skill, and their friendly, professional manner. Way to go Atomic! You have my business for life!
I used Go Green Express Home Services for a minor plastic pipe repair under my kitchen sink...The worker did a great job fixing this minor pipe plastic pipe repair( my original pipe was too short and he needed to extended the pipe and then reconnect). It took him less than 10 minutes to fix. I was first quoted $125 +tax but when the worker went to his truck and spoke to whoever he spoke to at the office, the price rose to $155.10 +tax for a total of $167.10...I thought that was a little too high. Will I use this company again, I Don't Know. It would be helpful if they would have a set price list for jobs (minor repairs, Major repairs etc...), then you as the consumer can see beforehand what the cost maybe and work from there with the company. Minor repairs, Major repairs this company should at least have a set-price list. ..The worker was great and efficient and did a good job on the repair but their prices are a bit costly. And yes, I did write this in their review.
Becoming a plumber is a two-pronged process that includes practical training and study. Traditionally, a hopeful plumber begins a four- or five-year apprenticeship program to receive technical education and complete the required hours of on-the-job training under a licensed professional. Plumbers who have successfully completed their apprenticeship are known as journeymen.

Wooden pipes were used in London and elsewhere during the 16th and 17th centuries. The pipes were hollowed-out logs, which were tapered at the end with a small hole in which the water would pass through.[16] The multiple pipes were then sealed together with hot animal fat. They were often used in Montreal and Boston in the 1800s, and built-up wooden tubes were widely used in the USA during the 20th century. These pipes, used in place of corrugated iron or reinforced concrete pipes, were made of sections cut from short lengths of wood. Locking of adjacent rings with hardwood dowel pins produced a flexible structure. About 100,000 feet of these wooden pipes were installed during WW2 in drainage culverts, storm sewers and conduits, under highways and at army camps, naval stations, airfields and ordnance plants.
Wedgeworth Plumbing, is a Texas (TX) Plumbing, Water Heater, Piping, Drain Cleaning, Sewer & Water Line service, replacement and maintenance Company located in Houston area. Wedgeworth Plumbing employs only the best technician and plumber for plumbing repair, water heater repair, and piping repair as well as plumbing replacement, sewer & water line replacement, and water heater replacement in Baytown TX, Bellaire TX, Cypress TX, Deer Park TX, Dickinson TX, Friendswood TX, Houston TX, Katy TX, Kemah TX, La Porte TX, League City TX, Missouri City TX, North Houston TX, Pasadena TX, Pearland TX, Richmond TX, Rosenberg TX, Santa Fe TX, Seabrook TX, South Houston TX, Spring TX, Stafford TX, Sugar Land TX, and Webster TX. So when you ask to find "A good plumbing repair or service company near me", you've come to the right place. To set-up a repair service estimate or replacement estimate, call (832) 867-5309. Wedgeworth Plumbing services all plumbing, piping, filter, and water heater brands including AO Smith, Bradford White, Rheem, Rinnai, State Water Heaters, among many others.

Plumbing Repair Co

×