Robert is knowledgeable, respectful and arrived within the time parameters he told me he would. He clearly communicated our problem to us and is working diligently to rectify it. I have to add, cleanliness in our household is of the utmost importance and Robert is meticulous with his work and pretty much left no trace of his presence when he was done. That part of the service in and of itself is invaluable.

Since 1991, we have provided our customers with dependable plumbing services—everything from replacing or installing kitchen and bathroom faucets, water heaters, hose bibs, and ice makers to whole or partial house re-piping, installing pressure reducing valves (PRVs) to aid in water conservation efforts, repairing leaks in water lines, or providing all new plumbing for remodels, room additions, or new house construction. We charge by the job, not by the hour.
Hello, We have a Hunter ceiling fan that no longer spins. It has power, as the light still works and when you push the remote you hear the clicking, like it's trying to engage, but the blades do not spin. Does this sound like a possible flywheel issue? I removed the Remote Receiver, part 85112-02, and apparently it's no longer available, but I don't think the receive is the problem. Any feedback would be welcome.
When water doesn’t stay where it’s supposed to, our Lakewood water damage restoration experts are at-the-ready to handle flooded basements, broken pipes, overflowing tubs and toilets, heavy rains, sewer line backups and other water issues. Roto-Rooter’s IICRC certified water cleanup professionals are available 24 hours a day, 365 days a year and will respond quickly to minimize damage to your property.
Our failure to enforce any right or provision of these Terms will not be considered a waiver of those rights. If any provision of these Terms is held to be invalid or unenforceable by a court, the remaining provisions of these Terms will remain in effect. These Terms constitute the entire agreement between us regarding our Service, and supersede and replace any prior agreements we might have between us regarding the Service.
Another way to avoid a service call from your plumber is to make sure the outside faucets are turned off in the winter and make sure you disconnect the outside hoses. You need to shut the water off from the inside. Then, open the valve on the outside to let the water that’s in there drain out—you switch both of them to the opposite direction so one is always closed and one is always open. We have to fix tons of these in the spring mostly because people leave their outside hoses connected and they freeze up. The repair could cost $100-$200 or more. Another tip would be if you’re going away for any length of time, like on vacation, turn off your water. If on any of those days the temperature drops below freezing, have someone check in on your house. I’ve been called to homes where the family returned from vacation, and there was water flooding out from the front door.

Sometimes a faucet leak can be stopped by replacing the rubber washer at the end of a faucet stem or cartridge.  This is a more common repair on older fixtures when things were built to last and designed to be able to be maintained.  Other times the whole stem or cartridge needs replacement or the bibb seat deeper back into the fixture needs replacement.  That leads to matching up the right components and often times making a trip to the hardware store or plumbing supply house necessary due to the many varieties, makes and models of faucets.  My advice is to make sure your Plumber has faucet repair kit on their truck before having them come out to assess the issue.
plumbing, piping systems inside buildings for water supply and sewage. The Romans had a highly developed plumbing system; water was brought to Rome by aqueducts and distributed to homes in lead pipes—hence the name plumbing from the Latin word plumbum for lead. During the Middle Ages, however, plumbing became almost nonexistent. In fact, London's first water system after the Middle Ages (c.1515) consisted partly of the rehabilitated Roman system; the rest was patterned after it. Modern plumbing began in the early 1800s, when steam engines became capable of supplying water under pressure and cheap cast iron pipes could be supplied to carry it. The common materials used today in water supply pipes are steel, copper, brass, plastic, and lead. Plumbing for sewage is made of cast iron, steel, asbestos cement, copper, and plastic. Water pressure is usually insufficient to supply the needs of tall apartment and office buildings; in such cases storage tanks are installed on the roof, into which a pump lifts water. The water then flows through the piping system of the building by gravity. Smaller buildings may have a pneumatic tank for the same purpose. The tank is partly filled with air, which is compressed when water is pumped in so that it will force water through the pipes. Sewage and drain systems typically have a trap, often a loop-shaped section of pipe, to seal off vapors in the pipes from the rest of the building. Vent pipes lead these vapors to the outside of the building; they also eliminate any suction in the piping and thus prevent the siphoning of water from traps when a nearby fixture discharges. In the 1970s and 80s flexible polybutylene plumbing was widely installed in standard and mobile homes. When unprecedented numbers of these plastic pipes began leaking because of exposure to chlorine and other chemicals in tap water, homeowners brought class-action lawsuits against the manufacturers, which were settled in 1995 for hundreds of millions of dollars.

Hi, I'm Brian Wear, owner of Brian Wear Plumbing. I started my own plumbing company in 2005, but I have been a plumber in the Columbia, Missouri area for over 20 years. Being a plumber for that length of a time requires a passion for plumbing repair and tireless hours perfecting the practice. We are a fully licensed business that will work to ensure that all your plumbing needs are met. I pride myself on our personal, friendly plumbing services at a reasonable price. When you call, we'll make sure you get the best service possible. I look forward to meeting you and providing for all your plumbing needs.


For many centuries, lead was the favoured material for water pipes, because its malleability made it practical to work into the desired shape. (Such use was so common that the word "plumbing" derives from plumbum, the Latin word for lead.) This was a source of lead-related health problems in the years before the health hazards of ingesting lead were fully understood; among these were stillbirths and high rates of infant mortality. Lead water pipes were still widely used in the early 20th century, and remain in many households. In addition, lead-tin alloy solder was commonly used to join copper pipes, but modern practice uses tin-antimony alloy solder instead, in order to eliminate lead hazards.[13]
Mounted under the sink, the garbage disposal is meant for chopping up small bits of waste food.  When switched on the motor spins and impellers — also called lugs — throw bits of food against a grinder ring. You should always run water while using the garbage disposal; once the garbage disposal does its job, the water flushes the finely chopped particles down the drain.
The word "plumber" dates from the Roman Empire.[3] The Latin for lead is plumbum. Roman roofs used lead in conduits and drain pipes[4] and some were also covered with lead, lead was also used for piping and for making baths.[5] In medieval times anyone who worked with lead was referred to as a plumber as can be seen from an extract of workmen fixing a roof in Westminster Palace and were referred to as plumbers "To Gilbert de Westminster, plumber, working about the roof of the pantry of the little hall, covering it with lead, and about various defects in the roof of the little hall".[6] Thus a person with expertise in working with lead was first known as a Plumbarius which was later shortened to plumber.
The introduction of the first water-retaining traps or seals in the 1850s, and the common use of "U"-shaped traps in the 1870s, were major steps forward. The design of the trap ensured that enough water remained in it to effectively block the passage of sewer gas back through the plumbing fixtures. During the 1870s vent pipes were introduced. They not only carried sewer gas out of the system, but also broke the suction created by movement of liquid in the pipes and eliminated the possibility of siphoning water that sealed the traps.
Don’t flush floss, tampons, or even so-called “flushable” wipes. They don’t break down like toilet paper does and can come back to haunt you later. “Toilets are more water-efficient now than they were 20 years ago, so there sometimes isn’t enough volume in the flush to force debris down,” says Marcin Wroblewski, president of ExpressRooter Plumbing in Toronto. “An object will get lodged in the trap and cause blockage when waste builds up days later.”

Those who attempted to bring plumbing indoors faced technical as well as attitudinal challenges. Decisions on how wastewater was removed required as much concern as those made to ensure an adequate water supply. But equally vexing was the prevailing miasma theory of disease, which held that illnesses stemmed from "bad air" that was readily identifiable by its offensive odor. This led to a distrust of early indoor plumbing that tended to leak and a deadly fear of the sewer gas that accompanied the leaks. It is no wonder then that many individuals maintained a strong belief that elimination was best taken care of out of doors.
Our goal in business is to treat all of our customers like friends; always treating them with respect, fairness, and honesty. We are a family owned and operated Connecticut plumbing company, and because of this all of our customers receive the attention that they deserve. Mike Marandino, the owner of the company, (as well as master plumber) works out on the road right alongside his employees. He or his wife handles all calls personally and it's the personal touch that makes us special. We strive for 100% satisfaction, and if for any reason a customer of ours isn't satisfied we promise we'll make it right.
Another way to avoid a service call from your plumber is to make sure the outside faucets are turned off in the winter and make sure you disconnect the outside hoses. You need to shut the water off from the inside. Then, open the valve on the outside to let the water that’s in there drain out—you switch both of them to the opposite direction so one is always closed and one is always open. We have to fix tons of these in the spring mostly because people leave their outside hoses connected and they freeze up. The repair could cost $100-$200 or more. Another tip would be if you’re going away for any length of time, like on vacation, turn off your water. If on any of those days the temperature drops below freezing, have someone check in on your house. I’ve been called to homes where the family returned from vacation, and there was water flooding out from the front door.
Since 1991, we have provided our customers with dependable plumbing services—everything from replacing or installing kitchen and bathroom faucets, water heaters, hose bibs, and ice makers to whole or partial house re-piping, installing pressure reducing valves (PRVs) to aid in water conservation efforts, repairing leaks in water lines, or providing all new plumbing for remodels, room additions, or new house construction. We charge by the job, not by the hour.
As Americas neighborhood plumber, Roto-Rooter Plumbing and Drain Service is committed to providing high-quality services at an affordable price. With over 75 years of experience, we have the residential and commercial expertise to fix any plumbing problem or make any new installation. We are the premier provider of plumbing services throughout the Lakewood, CO, area and we can meet all of your local needs. Our plumber provides convenient service, 24 hours a day, 7 days a week so you never have to wait to get the help you need. Our 24 hour emergency services can tackle even the most complex plumbing problems.

If you own a home and your plumbing toolkit consists of a lone plunger, chances are sooner than later you’ll need to tap into the knowledge or advice from someone versed in common plumbing repairs. Ace can help you in a pinch. While a plunger can be handy in several different scenarios, Ace Hardware has the plumbing tools, plumbing supplies and knowledgeable plumbing advice on hand to face a plumbing problem head on.
Although plumbers, pipefitters, and steamfitters perform three distinct and specialized roles, their duties are often similar. For example, they all install pipes and fittings that carry water, steam, air, or other liquids or gases. They determine the necessary materials for a job, connect pipes, and perform pressure tests to ensure that a pipe system is airtight and watertight. Their tools include drills, saws, welding torches, and wrenches.

In addition to water heaters, we also service and install well tanks, disposals, faucets, water closets (toilets), and re-piping of any type of water or drain lines. We also replace bathtubs, showers, sinks, vanity cabinets, and marbleized countertops. Are you looking for something more than simply replacing a sink or bathtub? No problem! We also provide complete kitchen or bathroom remodels to give your home a new look you'll be thrilled about.
Using corrosive chemicals to dissolve a clog is like throwing a grenade down a gopher hole. Instead, Wroblewski recommends flushing your drains weekly with a half cup of baking soda and one cup of vinegar. Let it fizz in the drain for ten minutes, then pour in four cups of boiling water. Find out about the plumbing nightmares that will make you cringe.
The thicknesses of the water pipe and tube walls can vary. Pipe wall thickness is denoted by various schedules or for large bore polyethylene pipe in the UK by the Standard Dimension Ratio (SDR), defined as the ratio of the pipe diameter to its wall thickness. Pipe wall thickness increases with schedule, and is available in schedules 20, 40, 80, and higher in special cases. The schedule is largely determined by the operating pressure of the system, with higher pressures commanding greater thickness. Copper tubing is available in four wall thicknesses: type DWV (thinnest wall; only allowed as drain pipe per UPC), type 'M' (thin; typically only allowed as drain pipe by IPC code), type 'L' (thicker, standard duty for water lines and water service), and type 'K' (thickest, typically used underground between the main and the meter). Because piping and tubing are commodities, having a greater wall thickness implies higher initial cost. Thicker walled pipe generally implies greater durability and higher pressure tolerances.
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