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Bob Carter started as with plumbers Indianapolis and moved his family to Greenwood in the late 1960’s.  He continued to do plumbing in Indianapolis and soon became a plumber in Greenwood as well.  Fast forward to today… Carter’s My Plumber is a 3rd Generation, family-owned Plumbing business operating from Greenwood, and serving the Indianapolis metro area. Son, Jamie and Grandson, Kelson now run the family business.

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As an Indianapolis plumber, Carter’s My Plumber has provided plumbing service to thousands of homeowners. With this level of service, it requires commitment and the capacity to serve a large community. We have Licensed Plumbers who are highly qualified and skilled, along with Licensed Plumbing Apprentices. The quality of work we perform is exceptional, and it is our goal to provide every Indianapolis homeowner an excellent experience. We have a menu of Plumbing Services that we provide, and we offer Free In-home estimates on many of these services. If you are looking for a locally owned and operated Plumbing company, you have found the right Plumber! We are properly Licensed and Certified by the City of Indianapolis to provide Plumbing service. We would love to be your Indianapolis Plumber!

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This information is not intended as an offer to sell, or the solicitation of an offer to buy, a franchise. It is for information purposes only. Read More Currently, the following states regulate the offer and sale of franchises: California, Hawaii, Illinois, Indiana, Maryland, Michigan, Minnesota, New York, North Dakota, Oregon, Rhode Island, South Dakota, Virginia, Washington, and Wisconsin. If you are a resident of or want to locate a franchise in one of these states, we will not offer you a franchise unless and until we have complied with applicable pre-sale registration and disclosure requirements in your state. Read Less Mr. Rooter is a registered trademark of Mr. Rooter LLC Copyright © 2017 Mr. Rooter, All rights reserved. All Mr. Rooter Plumbing Franchise Locations Are Independently Owned And Operated.
Present-day water-supply systems use a network of high-pressure pumps, and pipes in buildings are now made of copper,[25] brass, plastic (particularly cross-linked polyethylene called PEX, which is estimated to be used in 60% of single-family homes[26]), or other nontoxic material. Due to its toxicity, most cities moved away from lead water-supply piping by the 1920s in the United States,[27] although lead pipes were approved by national plumbing codes into the 1980s,[28] and lead was used in plumbing solder for drinking water until it was banned in 1986.[27] Drain and vent lines are made of plastic, steel, cast-iron, or lead.[29][30]
Clear the trap: If the above methods do not work, the next step would be to remove the P-trap under the sink. Place a bucket underneath the area to catch water then unscrew the two threaded caps that hold the curved section of the pipe in place. Nowadays, most kitchen drains are made of white PVC pipe with connections that can be unscrewed by hand.
Our plumbers are licensed, bonded, and insured and meet our rigid trust certification standards. Our services are guaranteed in writing against defects in materials and workmanship. So if you need to repair, maintain, or improve your plumbing or septic system, you can rely on Parker & Sons. Our plumbing service includes a 100% money back guarantee and our customer care policies are unmatched in the industry.
For the highest quality, expertise and excellent customer service you seek for all your plumbing repairs and plumbing installation needs, contact Baker Brothers Plumbing, Air Conditioning & Electrical at 214-892-2225214-892-2225 to schedule an appointment. Our licensed Dallas Plumbing technicians are background checked and drug-screened, ready to provide you with the best possible service in the DFW metroplex.
Estimating a plumbing job is best left to the professionals. However, our guides linked to throughout this article are the best first step to understanding pricing. Understanding basic plumbing is an excellent second step. Not only does this help you diagnose potential problems before they become costly ones, but it’ll help you understand what a plumber does.

At Magnolia Plumbing, Heating & Cooling, we offer 24/7 emergency plumbing services for all of our clients in the Washington, DC area. But is your plumbing issue urgent enough to call us? If you’re asking this question, the answer is most likely a yes. We can get to your home quickly and restore your plumbing system so that you continue to have access to potable water, or so that your home is protected from a burst pipe or a smaller leak.

PLUMBING. Plumbing is the system that supplies, distributes, uses, and removes water from a building. Among the components used in the system are pipes, fittings, sinks, basins, faucets, valves, drains, toilets, and tubs. In colonial America, water used for cleaning or cooking was typically brought into a building by bucket and the wastewater was later removed in the same way. Elimination, for the most part, tended to take place out-side in a privy or outhouse. Although there were rare isolated examples of indoor toilets and running water based on or using English and European technology, it was not until the mid-nineteenth century that there were an appreciable number of plumbing installations. For many households they amounted to nothing more than a hand pump and kitchen sink. For a far smaller number it also might be hot and cold running water and what early on became known as the bathroom. During the 1840s and 1850s, the major elements of the bath were in place and consisted simply of a water closet or toilet and a "bathtub." Light washing still took place at the bedroom wash-stand with its basin, water pitcher, and slop jar or bucket. It was not until the 1860s that these items began to be replaced gradually by basins, faucets, and running water installed in the bathroom.


Sump pumps are used to re-route water away from the lowest point of your home's foundation and protect your basement and easily damaged areas from flooding. In most cases, your sump pump is hardwired to your electrical system or possibly plugged into a wall outlet. Because these power sources can often fail in a storm when water damage occurs, sump pumps are typically equipped with battery backup power.
Where plumbing had been a mostly locally regulated matter for most of its history, the federal government became involved in the early 1990s. Until the 1950s, toilets generally used five or more gallons per flush (GPF). During the decades that followed, the plumbing industry reduced the standard volume for toilet flush tanks to 3.5 gallons. A further reduction in volume resulted from the Energy Policy Act of 1992, which in the name of conservation mandated that all new toilets made in the United States must use no more than 1.6 GPF. The same legislation also regulated the flow in shower heads and faucets. Although the first low-flow toilets proved un-satisfactory and were met with public disapproval, redesigned equipment employing new technology has removed most objections.
Our Water Heater failed and flooded our attic on the weekend. They answered the phone and had someone out the same day. By the next day, we had a new water heater installed and hot water, all over the weekend. They were quick and professional. Justin D answered all my questions and took the time to explain. When speaking to Justin it was clear that he cared and was well trained in customer experience. Thank you all for making a stressful situation a little easier to deal with. We appreciate your services.
As with other construction workers, employment of plumbers, pipefitters, and steamfitters is sensitive to fluctuations in the economy. On the one hand, workers may experience periods of unemployment when the overall level of construction falls. On the other hand, shortages of workers may occur in some areas during peak periods of building activity.

Justin D and Eric worked on four leaky spots in one afternoon replacing toilet parts, bathroom sink fixtures, shower fixtures and an ancient outdoor spigot that required going into the crawl space. All were done efficiently and with detailed explanations. Additionally, each work area was left completely cleaned up. I appreciate that they also alerted me to a duct work problem under the house which I may not have discovered for some time. My parents, also customers, and I are happy to give a big thumbs up to Atomic Plumbing. Thank you Justin D and Eric! Good team!
 My hot water heater needed replacement. Deanna was very pleasant, knowledgeable, and most helpful. She scheduled my appointment and James M. and Aaron arrived exactly on time. They were professional and had the job done in no time! Although it was a bit more expensive than I was expecting, the service was excellent. Thank you for a job well done. 

I was disappointed with the pressure of a tub and shower that were plumbed with 1/2 supply lines (2nd floor). Could be low pressure from the street, but I want to replace with 5/8. Plus, I'd like to have 2 back to back showers, one inside and one outside. So, I had intended to bring a 1 supply to both, then branch up to valves and shower head with 5/8. Finally, I thought pressure from the street was typically 55 to 70 psi and I am concerned if pvc can take that.Any thoughts?

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