Plumbing is any system that conveys fluids for a wide range of applications. Plumbing uses pipes, valves, plumbing fixtures, tanks, and other apparatuses to convey fluids.[1] Heating and cooling (HVAC), waste removal, and potable water delivery are among the most common uses for plumbing, but it is not limited to these applications.[2] The word derives from the Latin for lead, plumbum, as the first effective pipes used in the Roman era were lead pipes.[3]
It only seems right to put cleaning supplies, like sponges, rags and liquids, under the sink, but plumbers say NO to this. Besides just being in the way, they can cause trap leaks. Drain traps, which are the curved pipes under the sink, are meant to keep sewer gases from entering your home, while also allowing waste water to pass. Blocking them off with clutter ups the risk of your cleaning products and trash can bumping into the pipes and dislodging them. Don’t feel bad if you’ve made a plumping mistake. Here are 36 almost unbelievable plumbing and electrical goofs.
You'll want to make sure that whoever is working on your plumbing understands current building codes and has expert plumbing knowledge. Ask to see their trade license number as well as their registered business number. Asking to verify the dollar amounts of their bonding and insurance is also standard practice. Bonding and insurance helps protect you as the homeowner from accidents, injury, damage to property or unpaid work.

Several types of pipe were used during the nineteenth century. With little or no knowledge of its possible long-term harmful effects, lead pipe was widely used. Its low price and the ease with which it could be formed and joined made it the material of choice for many installations. Iron, brass, and copper pipe were used as well. It was not unusual for a structure to be plumbed with several types of pipe, each used where it was most suited. But by the early twentieth century there was a move away from lead piping. The basic elements of domestic plumbing, in both the kitchen and bathroom, were in place by the 1890s. Changes since that time have been primarily aesthetic and in the materials used. During the second half of the twentieth century, tubs and basins that previously had been made of glazed ceramic or enameled iron, and much of the pipe manufactured in the United States as well, were being made of plastic.
Want a directory of plumbers that offers more than a name and a phone number? Type in your zip code above and see how easy it is to find residential Plumbers, licensed plumbing contractors, sewer and drain cleaning contractors and even plumbers that specialize in bathroom remodeling. Need plumbers that handle plumbing and heating? No problem. We have all kinds of plumbers to choose from, even new construction and commercial plumbers. Once you type in your zip code above and see the list of plumbers, you might even be able to find recommended plumbers in your area and read feedback from your neighbors! You can then choose which plumber is right for you. Please return and post your experience so that we can continue to be the leading plumbing site for recommended plumbers. Since 2000, Find a Plumber.com is where homeowners find a plumber and the best plumbers find a home.
Ryan arrived on time with a positive attitude even though it was after hours on a Friday and did a great job. He quickly diagnosed and fixed the plumbing problem and answered several other questions I had regarding upgrades to bathroom fixtures. I was very impressed that Atomic was able to get a technician to my house within a few hours on a Friday night a few days before Christmas. Very professional organization and technician.
We have an outstanding reputation with the community and several water sanitation districts. We have an “A” rating with the BBB. We have been nominated for Angie’s list for many years in a row. You will never get an answering service when you call our company. You will reach the owners. The owner’s founded this plumbing company upon the idea of providing exceptional plumbing services for a fair and honest price. See details of our service guarantee
It's a little awkward, so we'll get straight to the point: This Thursday we humbly ask you to protect Wikipedia's independence. We depend on donations averaging about $16.36, but 99% of our readers don't give. If everyone reading this gave $3, we could keep Wikipedia thriving for years to come. The price of your Thursday coffee is all we need. We’re proud to have built a resource that benefits everyone, from a student pursuing their degree, to companies who use it to develop new technology to improve our lives. We can all find great things to learn on Wikipedia. It unites all of us who love knowledge: contributors, readers, and the donors who keep us thriving. The heart and soul of Wikipedia is a community of people working to bring you unlimited access to reliable, neutral information. Please take one minute to help us keep Wikipedia growing. Thank you.
I was disappointed with the pressure of a tub and shower that were plumbed with 1/2 supply lines (2nd floor). Could be low pressure from the street, but I want to replace with 5/8. Plus, I'd like to have 2 back to back showers, one inside and one outside. So, I had intended to bring a 1 supply to both, then branch up to valves and shower head with 5/8. Finally, I thought pressure from the street was typically 55 to 70 psi and I am concerned if pvc can take that.Any thoughts?

Rooter Plumbing

×