Garbage disposers usually come with an Allen key. Find a good place to store it, and when the disposer jams, you can follow the directions in the owner’s manual to fix it yourself. It’s as simple as inserting and twisting, and doing this yourself will save you the hassle and cash of a service call to the plumber. Speaking of tool storage, check out these clever tool storage ideas.
Some allege that putting a brick in the toilet tank can save water, but doing that can keep your toilet from flushing correctly. Another plumbing tip, avoid liquid drain cleaners. Liquid drain cleaners are also bad news—they eat away at the pipes. Try a plunger or, better yet, a $30 auger. Don’t have either? Here’s how to unclog a toilet without a plunger.

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Several types of pipe were used during the nineteenth century. With little or no knowledge of its possible long-term harmful effects, lead pipe was widely used. Its low price and the ease with which it could be formed and joined made it the material of choice for many installations. Iron, brass, and copper pipe were used as well. It was not unusual for a structure to be plumbed with several types of pipe, each used where it was most suited. But by the early twentieth century there was a move away from lead piping. The basic elements of domestic plumbing, in both the kitchen and bathroom, were in place by the 1890s. Changes since that time have been primarily aesthetic and in the materials used. During the second half of the twentieth century, tubs and basins that previously had been made of glazed ceramic or enameled iron, and much of the pipe manufactured in the United States as well, were being made of plastic.
Becoming a plumber is a two-pronged process that includes practical training and study. Traditionally, a hopeful plumber begins a four- or five-year apprenticeship program to receive technical education and complete the required hours of on-the-job training under a licensed professional. Plumbers who have successfully completed their apprenticeship are known as journeymen.
Despite the Romans' common use of lead pipes, their aqueducts rarely poisoned people. Unlike other parts of the world where lead pipes cause poisoning, the Roman water had so much calcium in it that a layer of plaque prevented the water contacting the lead itself. What often causes confusion is the large amount of evidence of widespread lead poisoning, particularly amongst those who would have had easy access to piped water.[14] This was an unfortunate result of lead being used in cookware and as an additive to processed food and drink, for example as a preservative in wine.[15] Roman lead pipe inscriptions provided information on the owner to prevent water theft.
Plumbers, pipefitters, and steamfitters may use many different materials and construction techniques, depending on the type of project. Residential water systems, for example, use copper, steel, and plastic pipe that one or two plumbers can install. Power plant water systems, by contrast, are made of large steel pipes that usually take a crew of pipefitters to install. Some workers install stainless steel pipes on dairy farms and in factories, mainly to prevent contamination.
The difference between pipes and tubes is simply in the way it is sized. PVC pipe for plumbing applications and galvanized steel pipe for instance, are measured in IPS (iron pipe size). Copper tube, CPVC, PeX and other tubing is measured nominally, which is basically an average diameter. These sizing schemes allow for universal adaptation of transitional fittings. For instance, 1/2" PeX tubing is the same size as 1/2" copper tubing. 1/2" PVC on the other hand is not the same size as 1/2" tubing, and therefore requires either a threaded male or female adapter to connect them. When used in agricultural irrigation, the singular form "pipe" is often used as a plural.[19]

plumbing, piping systems inside buildings for water supply and sewage. The Romans had a highly developed plumbing system; water was brought to Rome by aqueducts and distributed to homes in lead pipes—hence the name plumbing from the Latin word plumbum for lead. During the Middle Ages, however, plumbing became almost nonexistent. In fact, London's first water system after the Middle Ages (c.1515) consisted partly of the rehabilitated Roman system; the rest was patterned after it. Modern plumbing began in the early 1800s, when steam engines became capable of supplying water under pressure and cheap cast iron pipes could be supplied to carry it. The common materials used today in water supply pipes are steel, copper, brass, plastic, and lead. Plumbing for sewage is made of cast iron, steel, asbestos cement, copper, and plastic. Water pressure is usually insufficient to supply the needs of tall apartment and office buildings; in such cases storage tanks are installed on the roof, into which a pump lifts water. The water then flows through the piping system of the building by gravity. Smaller buildings may have a pneumatic tank for the same purpose. The tank is partly filled with air, which is compressed when water is pumped in so that it will force water through the pipes. Sewage and drain systems typically have a trap, often a loop-shaped section of pipe, to seal off vapors in the pipes from the rest of the building. Vent pipes lead these vapors to the outside of the building; they also eliminate any suction in the piping and thus prevent the siphoning of water from traps when a nearby fixture discharges. In the 1970s and 80s flexible polybutylene plumbing was widely installed in standard and mobile homes. When unprecedented numbers of these plastic pipes began leaking because of exposure to chlorine and other chemicals in tap water, homeowners brought class-action lawsuits against the manufacturers, which were settled in 1995 for hundreds of millions of dollars.
Not all plumbing companies can guarantee up-front pricing, superior workmanship and parts, licensed and insured plumbing contractors, and courteous support from uniformed professionals. Whether you are in need of drain cleaning or would like to schedule a plumbing inspection for your home, Mr. Rooter's plumbing services can handle it all! Our skilled plumbers are knowledgeable and equipped with the latest tools needed to achieve optimal results. Give us a call at (855) 982-2028, or request a job estimate online.
At BelRed Energy Solutions, we have extensive experience with HVAC maintenance and protecting homes with air purifying technology like the Air Scrubber Plus. Allow our expert technicians to purify, deodorize, and protect the air your family breathes. To learn more about the Air Scrubber Plus, air scrubber installation, duct cleaning, or other allergy preventing services…
Our water heater busted on Saturday. Sean came right out and was very informative and helpful. He explained that they would need to secure our type of water heater and once successful he would be out first thing Sunday morning to install it. He was here first thing at 7:30 AM with a smile on his face and removed the old water heater and installed the new one in no time. Sean is very knowledgeable and personable. My husband and I enjoyed talking about Football with him while he was here. I would also like to mention Tiffany, the dispatcher, she was great as well, very helpful when I made the initial call. I would definitely recommend Atomic Plumbing and Sean to anyone needing plumbing work done in the future.

In urban areas, the emptying of chamber pots straight into the street, and the accumulation of piles of human waste, resulted in disease and an unpleasant urban environment. Night-soil men were often employed to collect excreta, which was spread on the fields as fertilizer. Although Sir John Harrington had developed an indoor flushing toilet for Queen Elizabeth I in 1596, it was not until the rise of mass industrialization and urbanization in the nineteenth century that domestic toilets were mass-produced in northern England. Flushing technology was improved through the efforts of inventive manufacturers such as John Shanks, George Jennings, Alexander Cummings, and Thomas Crapper in the United Kingdom (Reyburn 1969) and Thomas Maddocks, John Randall Mann, William Campbell, and Henry Demarest, among others, in the United States (Palmer 1973). Early toilet manufacturers were generally companies that had first made their name in the manufacture of china and earthenware. Such English companies as Minton, Twyford, and Doulton adapted their production processes to make porcelain toilet bowls and pans. Toilet design was based upon the “sit” rather than “squat” mode of excretion (which required nothing more than a hole in the ground). The sit approach required a specific and highly marketable consumer product, the “pedestal” toilet, along with all the plumbing fixtures, such as taps (faucets), cisterns, basins, and fittings that together made up the “bathroom.” Interestingly, urinals for men, although a common feature of public toilets, are not generally a feature of private domestic bathrooms. These artifacts were exported from Britain to the rest of the world as a sign of modernity and Western progress, and were rapidly adopted for fear of being seen as “backward” or “dirty,” in spite of the fact that the majority of the world’s population squats when eliminating waste, a position that is ergonomically more healthy and efficient.
Although plumbers, pipefitters, and steamfitters perform three distinct and specialized roles, their duties are often similar. For example, they all install pipes and fittings that carry water, steam, air, or other liquids or gases. They determine the necessary materials for a job, connect pipes, and perform pressure tests to ensure that a pipe system is airtight and watertight. Their tools include drills, saws, welding torches, and wrenches.

We offer several financing options for new equipment, as well as our Priority Club Membership that grants members exclusive discounts, priority service, annual tune-ups, and much more. Plus, we make it our mission to give back to the community that’s continually supported us for decades. Our team members regularly donate their time, money, and efforts to numerous charitable organizations, fundraising endeavors, and worthwhile causes throughout the Northern Virginia and suburban Maryland area.


Faucets for the kitchen come in an array of styles, and costs vary as well, from simple single handle models running less than $50 to pull down faucets like those used in restaurant kitchens costing more than $200. One handle or two, separate pullout sprayer or pull down, countertop or wall mount, these also feature a variety of finishes from stainless steel to nickel and bronze.

You’ll know when it’s time to install a new water heater. Water heater installation costs average between $360 and $780 nationally, with rates increasing depending on the project. The total project cost will be higher when you include the cost of the heater itself. Select your new water heater based on the number of occupants in your home and the number of gallons of capacity you’ll need. Installation costs can vary based on the type of water heater you are removing and the type you are installing, any necessary repairs, regional cost of labor, and whether disposal of the old heater is included. Natural gas water heaters retail on average between $650 and $900 for standard models. Electric water heaters range between $300 and $700 for standard models. Tankless electric water heaters retail on average between $250 and $700 for standard models. Tankless gas water heaters retail on average between $200 and $1,300.

Pipefitters, sometimes simply called fitters, install and maintain pipes that carry chemicals, acids, and gases. These pipes are used mostly in manufacturing, commercial, and industrial settings. Fitters install and repair pipe systems in power plants, as well as heating and cooling systems in large office buildings. Some pipefitters specialize as gasfitters, sprinklerfitters, or steamfitters.
Bob Carter started as with plumbers Indianapolis and moved his family to Greenwood in the late 1960’s.  He continued to do plumbing in Indianapolis and soon became a plumber in Greenwood as well.  Fast forward to today… Carter’s My Plumber is a 3rd Generation, family-owned Plumbing business operating from Greenwood, and serving the Indianapolis metro area. Son, Jamie and Grandson, Kelson now run the family business.

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