Bob Carter started as with plumbers Indianapolis and moved his family to Greenwood in the late 1960’s.  He continued to do plumbing in Indianapolis and soon became a plumber in Greenwood as well.  Fast forward to today… Carter’s My Plumber is a 3rd Generation, family-owned Plumbing business operating from Greenwood, and serving the Indianapolis metro area. Son, Jamie and Grandson, Kelson now run the family business.
 Justin and Paul were extremely polite. They worked as quickly as they could and got my hot water heater replaced. I have two dogs that are a handful, and they learned their names and talked to them to help keep them calm, which meant a lot to me. I felt comfortable having them in my home. The customer service at the company was great as well, very helpful on the phone. I would recommend them. 

Despite the Romans' common use of lead pipes, their aqueducts rarely poisoned people. Unlike other parts of the world where lead pipes cause poisoning, the Roman water had so much calcium in it that a layer of plaque prevented the water contacting the lead itself. What often causes confusion is the large amount of evidence of widespread lead poisoning, particularly amongst those who would have had easy access to piped water.[14] This was an unfortunate result of lead being used in cookware and as an additive to processed food and drink, for example as a preservative in wine.[15] Roman lead pipe inscriptions provided information on the owner to prevent water theft.
Sinks can also be mounted from above or below the counter, or vanity, and homeowners have the option to put in a contemporary vessel sink, which sits on top of the counter. Costs range from less than $100 for a basic, porcelain drop-in or pedestal sink, to several hundred dollars or more for a cast iron vessel sink. Install tends to run between $150 to $200 though it can cost more depending on who you hire and the complexity of the job.
What sets us apart from other plumbing contractors is our strong commitment to the customer. We carry out services that have your best interests in mind. Our team is interested in building genuine, long-term relationships with our customers and taking care of all of our customers with the same level of dedication. No matter the problem at hand, you can be confident that you will receive the personal attention you deserve.
Keeping your trash dispoal clean isn't very difficult or time consuming. Fill the sink at least half full of soapy water. Remove the stopper from the drain while simultaneously turning on the disposal. This will fill the entire disposal with soapy water and help to flush out food buildup. It will also clean the blades and flush your pipes with clean water.

HOT WATER HEATER REPAIR AND INSTALATION Option One Plumbers in Phoenix, San Diego and the Inland Empire do installs, repairs, or replacements of all types of water heaters including electric, natural gas, propane, and tankless for both residential and commercial uses. We are your local water heater Phoenix, San Diego and the Inland Empire experts and have been servicing water heaters for decades.


Whether you’re in the market for a gas, electric, tankless, or high-efficiency water heater, we can help you get it fast. We offer same-day water heater installation so you can enjoy your new water heater as soon as possible. If you call us by 3:00 p.m., we’ll have your water heater up and running by the end of the day; call after 3:00 p.m. and we’ll make sure it gets done the next day.
plumbing, piping systems inside buildings for water supply and sewage. The Romans had a highly developed plumbing system; water was brought to Rome by aqueducts and distributed to homes in lead pipes—hence the name plumbing from the Latin word plumbum for lead. During the Middle Ages, however, plumbing became almost nonexistent. In fact, London's first water system after the Middle Ages (c.1515) consisted partly of the rehabilitated Roman system; the rest was patterned after it. Modern plumbing began in the early 1800s, when steam engines became capable of supplying water under pressure and cheap cast iron pipes could be supplied to carry it. The common materials used today in water supply pipes are steel, copper, brass, plastic, and lead. Plumbing for sewage is made of cast iron, steel, asbestos cement, copper, and plastic. Water pressure is usually insufficient to supply the needs of tall apartment and office buildings; in such cases storage tanks are installed on the roof, into which a pump lifts water. The water then flows through the piping system of the building by gravity. Smaller buildings may have a pneumatic tank for the same purpose. The tank is partly filled with air, which is compressed when water is pumped in so that it will force water through the pipes. Sewage and drain systems typically have a trap, often a loop-shaped section of pipe, to seal off vapors in the pipes from the rest of the building. Vent pipes lead these vapors to the outside of the building; they also eliminate any suction in the piping and thus prevent the siphoning of water from traps when a nearby fixture discharges. In the 1970s and 80s flexible polybutylene plumbing was widely installed in standard and mobile homes. When unprecedented numbers of these plastic pipes began leaking because of exposure to chlorine and other chemicals in tap water, homeowners brought class-action lawsuits against the manufacturers, which were settled in 1995 for hundreds of millions of dollars.
We had a leak under the kitchen sink & called Atomic Plumbing. They sent someone over that same day. They sent an email appointment confirmation & kept us posted both via email & telephone on the status of our appointment & expected arrival of the plumber. Our plumber was Don Richards. He was very pleasant and professional. He used protective covering on his shoes & went over the cost of the repair. He fixed the leak in no time and did not leave a mess at all. Very impressive. Thanks for the outstanding service Atomic Plumbing!

I was disappointed with the pressure of a tub and shower that were plumbed with 1/2 supply lines (2nd floor). Could be low pressure from the street, but I want to replace with 5/8. Plus, I'd like to have 2 back to back showers, one inside and one outside. So, I had intended to bring a 1 supply to both, then branch up to valves and shower head with 5/8. Finally, I thought pressure from the street was typically 55 to 70 psi and I am concerned if pvc can take that.Any thoughts?

Rooter Plumbing

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