Where plumbing had been a mostly locally regulated matter for most of its history, the federal government became involved in the early 1990s. Until the 1950s, toilets generally used five or more gallons per flush (GPF). During the decades that followed, the plumbing industry reduced the standard volume for toilet flush tanks to 3.5 gallons. A further reduction in volume resulted from the Energy Policy Act of 1992, which in the name of conservation mandated that all new toilets made in the United States must use no more than 1.6 GPF. The same legislation also regulated the flow in shower heads and faucets. Although the first low-flow toilets proved un-satisfactory and were met with public disapproval, redesigned equipment employing new technology has removed most objections.
Do you think you have a water leak in your house or business in Phoenix, San Diego and the Inland Empire? Does your floor feel hot? Have you noticed an unexpected increase in your Phoenix, San Diego and the Inland Empire water or gas bill? Our plumbers in Phoenix, San Diego and the Inland Empire are experts in the latest electronic leak detection technology.

Do you need a Hot Water Circulating Pump for your home in Phoenix, San Diego and the Inland Empire? This system can deliver hot water to fixtures quickly without waiting for the water to get hot. Rather than relying on low water pressure common in most water lines, recirculating systems use a pump to rapidly move water from a water heater to the fixtures.


Plumbers develop blueprints to plan where pipes and fixtures should be plotted in a structure. They also install and connect the piping and fixtures, either working individually or with a team of apprentices and pipefitters. In addition to facilitating water supply from pipes and large fixtures, such as bathtubs, showers, sinks and toilets, plumbers ensure that water reaches appliances like dishwashers and water heaters. The best in the occupation are strong problem-solvers who have mastered customer service and can meet the physical and mechanical demands of the job.

Specialized plumbing tools include pipe wrenches, flaring pliers, pipe vise, pipe bending machine, pipe cutter, dies, and joining tools such as soldering torches and crimp tools. New tools have been developed to help plumbers fix problems more efficiently. For example, plumbers use video cameras for inspections of hidden leaks or problems, they use hydro jets, and high pressure hydraulic pumps connected to steel cables for trench-less sewer line replacement.
Cast iron and ductile iron pipe was long a lower-cost alternative to copper, before the advent of durable plastic materials but special non-conductive fittings must be used where transitions are to be made to other metallic pipes, except for terminal fittings, in order to avoid corrosion owing to electrochemical reactions between dissimilar metals (see galvanic cell).[17]
Hi, I'm Brian Wear, owner of Brian Wear Plumbing. I started my own plumbing company in 2005, but I have been a plumber in the Columbia, Missouri area for over 20 years. Being a plumber for that length of a time requires a passion for plumbing repair and tireless hours perfecting the practice. We are a fully licensed business that will work to ensure that all your plumbing needs are met. I pride myself on our personal, friendly plumbing services at a reasonable price. When you call, we'll make sure you get the best service possible. I look forward to meeting you and providing for all your plumbing needs.

Pipefitters, sometimes simply called fitters, install and maintain pipes that carry chemicals, acids, and gases. These pipes are used mostly in manufacturing, commercial, and industrial settings. Fitters install and repair pipe systems in power plants, as well as heating and cooling systems in large office buildings. Some pipefitters specialize as gasfitters, sprinklerfitters, or steamfitters.


The word "plumber" dates from the Roman Empire.[3] The Latin for lead is plumbum. Roman roofs used lead in conduits and drain pipes[4] and some were also covered with lead, lead was also used for piping and for making baths.[5] In medieval times anyone who worked with lead was referred to as a plumber as can be seen from an extract of workmen fixing a roof in Westminster Palace and were referred to as plumbers "To Gilbert de Westminster, plumber, working about the roof of the pantry of the little hall, covering it with lead, and about various defects in the roof of the little hall".[6] Thus a person with expertise in working with lead was first known as a Plumbarius which was later shortened to plumber.

Justin D and Eric worked on four leaky spots in one afternoon replacing toilet parts, bathroom sink fixtures, shower fixtures and an ancient outdoor spigot that required going into the crawl space. All were done efficiently and with detailed explanations. Additionally, each work area was left completely cleaned up. I appreciate that they also alerted me to a duct work problem under the house which I may not have discovered for some time. My parents, also customers, and I are happy to give a big thumbs up to Atomic Plumbing. Thank you Justin D and Eric! Good team!
Need a quick fix? After having a plumber come out to your house, they might tell you the part needed to fix your toilet or sink issue is going to take a week. Don’t be too amenable if you can’t wait. There’s no shame in working with another plumber who can get the part and do the job when you need it. If you’re doing the job yourself, be sure you know these tips for completing a plumbing fix like a pro.
Arverne, Astoria, Bayside, Bellerose, Cambria Heights, College Point, Corona, East Elmhurst, Elmhurst, Far Rockaway, Floral Park, Flushing, Fresh Meadows, Glen Oaks, Hollis, Howard Beach, Jamaica, Kew Gardens, Little Neck, Long Island City, Maspeth, Middle Village, New Hyde Park, Ozone Park, Queens Village, Rego Park, Richmond Hill, Ridgewood, Rosedale, Saint Albans, South Ozone Park, South Richmond Hill, Sunnyside, Whitestone, Woodhaven, Woodside
We live in a recently completed townhouse that was built with double-wall construction. That construction method was touted by the builder as what would keep sound from penetrating between the units. But we can hear the next door neighbors' TV and stereo, and sometimes voices and even snoring, through the wall. While sometimes it's the volume, mostly it's the bass sounds coming through the wall. They say they don't hear us, but we keep our bass turned down. They crank up the bass, and they are not going to change that. They also are not going to do anything construction-wise to help from their side. What is the best way for us to try to block the low frequency/bass sounds from penetrating the existing wall into our side?

Most states and localities require plumbers to be licensed. Although licensing requirements vary, most states and localities require workers to have 2 to 5 years of experience and to pass an exam that shows their knowledge of the trade and of local plumbing codes before they are permitted to work independently. In addition, most employers require plumbers to have a driver’s license.
Sinks can also be mounted from above or below the counter, or vanity, and homeowners have the option to put in a contemporary vessel sink, which sits on top of the counter. Costs range from less than $100 for a basic, porcelain drop-in or pedestal sink, to several hundred dollars or more for a cast iron vessel sink. Install tends to run between $150 to $200 though it can cost more depending on who you hire and the complexity of the job.
My hot water heater ruptured at 2030 on a Tuesday and Justin along with Trey were at my house at 0830 the next morning. They were consummate professionals the entire time they were in my garage. They were courteous and polite and worked as hard as they could on a difficult removal and replacement. I can't thank them and Atomic Pluming enough. I'll call them for anything in the future and you should too!
Plumbing is any system that conveys fluids for a wide range of applications. Plumbing uses pipes, valves, plumbing fixtures, tanks, and other apparatuses to convey fluids.[1] Heating and cooling (HVAC), waste removal, and potable water delivery are among the most common uses for plumbing, but it is not limited to these applications.[2] The word derives from the Latin for lead, plumbum, as the first effective pipes used in the Roman era were lead pipes.[3]
×