It only seems right to put cleaning supplies, like sponges, rags and liquids, under the sink, but plumbers say NO to this. Besides just being in the way, they can cause trap leaks. Drain traps, which are the curved pipes under the sink, are meant to keep sewer gases from entering your home, while also allowing waste water to pass. Blocking them off with clutter ups the risk of your cleaning products and trash can bumping into the pipes and dislodging them. Don’t feel bad if you’ve made a plumping mistake. Here are 36 almost unbelievable plumbing and electrical goofs.

Get a minimum of three bids. Estimates for an average-sized job should be within a few hundred dollars. Be suspicious of anything that is substantially lower or double the price of the rest, and watch out for hidden fees, like charges for travel expenses. They could be signs of a home improvement scam. A good plumber will not nickel and dime you like this, and many of us will offer free estimates.


Wedgeworth Plumbing, is a Texas (TX) Plumbing, Water Heater, Piping, Drain Cleaning, Sewer & Water Line service, replacement and maintenance Company located in Houston area. Wedgeworth Plumbing employs only the best technician and plumber for plumbing repair, water heater repair, and piping repair as well as plumbing replacement, sewer & water line replacement, and water heater replacement in Baytown TX, Bellaire TX, Cypress TX, Deer Park TX, Dickinson TX, Friendswood TX, Houston TX, Katy TX, Kemah TX, La Porte TX, League City TX, Missouri City TX, North Houston TX, Pasadena TX, Pearland TX, Richmond TX, Rosenberg TX, Santa Fe TX, Seabrook TX, South Houston TX, Spring TX, Stafford TX, Sugar Land TX, and Webster TX. So when you ask to find "A good plumbing repair or service company near me", you've come to the right place. To set-up a repair service estimate or replacement estimate, call (832) 867-5309. Wedgeworth Plumbing services all plumbing, piping, filter, and water heater brands including AO Smith, Bradford White, Rheem, Rinnai, State Water Heaters, among many others.
Plumbing is any system that conveys fluids for a wide range of applications. Plumbing uses pipes, valves, plumbing fixtures, tanks, and other apparatuses to convey fluids.[1] Heating and cooling (HVAC), waste removal, and potable water delivery are among the most common uses for plumbing, but it is not limited to these applications.[2] The word derives from the Latin for lead, plumbum, as the first effective pipes used in the Roman era were lead pipes.[3]
What sets us apart from other plumbing contractors is our strong commitment to the customer. We carry out services that have your best interests in mind. Our team is interested in building genuine, long-term relationships with our customers and taking care of all of our customers with the same level of dedication. No matter the problem at hand, you can be confident that you will receive the personal attention you deserve.
While in the past, mains drainage and indoor plumbing were a sign of modernity, today people want “designer” bathrooms, luxury fixtures, power showers, fitted kitchens, and the latest technology. There has been a “restroom revolution” in Asia in particular, with companies such as Toto producing complete prefabricated bathroom units for the Japanese housing market, all the components being made together. Colored polyester resins, modern plastics, and marble and granite composites feature strongly in these modern bathroom modules (Greed 2003). Likewise, modern automatic public toilets are fully integrated, prefabricated systems that often use stainless steel and pathogen-resistant polymer materials. However, user-end toilet innovation must be matched by provider-end infrastructural sewerage system provision. The functionality of domestic toilets is dependent on there being a working sewerage system to take away output. Alternatively, the output from a luxury bathroom, as is the case in some affluent areas in developing countries, might end up in a cesspool under the house for collection by traditional night-soil operatives. Alternatively, as in some parts of the Americas and Australasia, even upmarket private houses are not served by a municipal sewerage and drainage system, and depend upon their own cesspits, generators, and water tanks.
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Just because they’re not in your sight on a daily basis doesn’t mean you should ignore your septic lines. If you have a septic system, lateral septic lines will be buried beneath some of your property. Be sure to avoid them! For example, don’t drive a heavy vehicle over them because that can cause them to collapse and result in a costly fix. Not sure how a septic tank works? Here’s the info.

Garbage disposers usually come with an Allen key. Find a good place to store it, and when the disposer jams, you can follow the directions in the owner’s manual to fix it yourself. It’s as simple as inserting and twisting, and doing this yourself will save you the hassle and cash of a service call to the plumber. Speaking of tool storage, check out these clever tool storage ideas.
Your water heater is an essential part of your home, heating water for showers, dishwashing, laundry and more. On average, a traditional water heater will last 8-12 years. The general consensus is that it’s better to replace your water heater with a new one than to repair one that’s 10 years old or more. Older models are less energy-efficient and thus more costly to run than newer models with better technology. Here are some indicators of when it may be time to replace an old water heater instead of repairing it:
While in the past, mains drainage and indoor plumbing were a sign of modernity, today people want “designer” bathrooms, luxury fixtures, power showers, fitted kitchens, and the latest technology. There has been a “restroom revolution” in Asia in particular, with companies such as Toto producing complete prefabricated bathroom units for the Japanese housing market, all the components being made together. Colored polyester resins, modern plastics, and marble and granite composites feature strongly in these modern bathroom modules (Greed 2003). Likewise, modern automatic public toilets are fully integrated, prefabricated systems that often use stainless steel and pathogen-resistant polymer materials. However, user-end toilet innovation must be matched by provider-end infrastructural sewerage system provision. The functionality of domestic toilets is dependent on there being a working sewerage system to take away output. Alternatively, the output from a luxury bathroom, as is the case in some affluent areas in developing countries, might end up in a cesspool under the house for collection by traditional night-soil operatives. Alternatively, as in some parts of the Americas and Australasia, even upmarket private houses are not served by a municipal sewerage and drainage system, and depend upon their own cesspits, generators, and water tanks.
Water systems of ancient times relied on gravity for the supply of water, using pipes or channels usually made of clay, lead, bamboo, wood, or stone. Hollowed wooden logs wrapped in steel banding were used for plumbing pipes, particularly water mains. Logs were used for water distribution in England close to 500 years ago. US cities began using hollowed logs in the late 1700s through the 1800s. Today, most plumbing supply pipe is made out of steel, copper, and plastic; most waste (also known as "soil")[21] out of steel, copper, plastic, and cast iron.[21]
Needed to replace a water pressure regulator.  Looking at the retail costs of the regulator, they seem to run from abouit $60 to over $300 for one that includes more that the basic control of water pressure in the house.  Had not used a pro plumber for over 20 years so I was not up on the costs associated with needing their help.  I was contacted by at least 3 plumbers but only one, Right Now Plumbers, gave me an instant quote of $394  for the service without me even asking. Although I thought this price seemed a little high for a job that takes less than an hour to complete, I accepted their service.  Must say that the job was done very professionally and would use them again if needed.  However,
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Outstanding, friendly, reasonably priced, and professional work! Atomic Plumbing provided excellent service from the timely response, to my call to updates prior to their arrival time, to the actual work conducted on site. They provided me with options and didn't try and strong arm us into service we didn't need. They stayed with us until we could verify the service was complete (and the toilet didn't back up again) and ensured we had peace of mind about the work that was done before they left. I asked for additional service to be completed on the upstairs bathroom shower and the technician, James M., provided an initial assessment for free and gave me options. Once I determined it was going to need his expertise, he quickly and efficiently got to work and fixed that problem too. They were military friendly and provided me a 10% discount which for a family of five on a single income, every little bit helps! I would STRONGLY recommend Atomic over the other guys any day of the week! Thank you Atomic! -Nick R.
Most large cities today pipe solid wastes to sewage treatment plants in order to separate and partially purify the water, before emptying into streams or other bodies of water. For potable water use, galvanized iron piping was commonplace in the United States from the late 1800s until around 1960. After that period, copper piping took over, first soft copper with flared fittings, then with rigid copper tubing utilizing soldered fittings.
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