Need a quick fix? After having a plumber come out to your house, they might tell you the part needed to fix your toilet or sink issue is going to take a week. Don’t be too amenable if you can’t wait. There’s no shame in working with another plumber who can get the part and do the job when you need it. If you’re doing the job yourself, be sure you know these tips for completing a plumbing fix like a pro.


While it’s their job to make sure your pipes work like a well-oiled machine, it’s not their job to rebuild the wall they had to demolish to make that happen. So, while you’re going to get that water problem fixed, you’ll want to discuss in detail what kind of “mess” they might leave behind prior to the start of the project so you can plan accordingly. Remember, there are some jobs you can do yourself. Here’s how to solder copper pipe joints!
To work independently, a plumber is required to receive a license. In most states, the prerequisite for earning this license is two to five years of practical experience. There's also an exam to test technical know-how and understanding of plumbing codes. The United Association's website offers extensive information on licensing requirements by state.
It only seems right to put cleaning supplies, like sponges, rags and liquids, under the sink, but plumbers say NO to this. Besides just being in the way, they can cause trap leaks. Drain traps, which are the curved pipes under the sink, are meant to keep sewer gases from entering your home, while also allowing waste water to pass. Blocking them off with clutter ups the risk of your cleaning products and trash can bumping into the pipes and dislodging them. Don’t feel bad if you’ve made a plumping mistake. Here are 36 almost unbelievable plumbing and electrical goofs.
The progress of a society may be judged by the way in which it disposes of its human waste material, and thus by the quality of its sewerage system (Mumford 1961, chap. 8). In the ancient world, the Greeks and Romans put great emphasis upon town planning. Roman cities were famed for their sewers, drains, aqueducts, paved streets, and roads. Domestic plumbing ranged from marble bathrooms with under-floor heating and indoor toilets in upmarket villas to basic latrine provision for the Roman army, as found, for example, alongside Hadrian’s Wall in northern Britain (Greed 2003). Following the decline of the Roman Empire, waste disposal returned to more primitive methods. Most ordinary people used an outdoor “privy,” while nobles often had an “indoor” toilet built out from the wall of their castle, hanging over the moat. In the Christian West during the Middle Ages, indoor plumbing, or for that matter personal hygiene and privacy, were not highly esteemed marks of civilization or progress, although washing and bathing, and bathhouses, were given higher priority in the Muslim East (Bonneville 1997).

No plumber is going to come right out and explain that they don’t have the required license to work for you. So if you know someone who is a great plumber, but they don’t have a license, hire them at your own risk. Licensed plumbers know the local building codes and regulations, have completed a certain amount of hours on the job and are insured. Want to become a master plumber yourself? Here are 28 tips.
An apprenticeship is the most common pathway to becoming a plumber. Many unions and businesses mandate that an apprentice receive a minimum of 246 hours of technical education, which could include instruction in math, applied physics and chemistry, and up to 2,000 hours of paid, practical training working with an experienced plumber. Safety training is also an important component of the process, since injuries are common in this line of work. "We have many hours worth of [Occupational Safety and Health Administration] training before we go on to a job site," says Patrick Kellett, the administrative assistant to the general president for the United Association of Journeymen and Apprentices of the Plumbing, Pipe Fitting Industry of the United States, Canada and Australia. "We're very conscious of the dangers that come with working in construction."
Scott was very knowledgeable and happy to test out all items of my finikie hot water heater. He called in tech support and tested pressures and did a vent pipe test to check air flow. How do I know this, because he explained everything to me. One afternoon with him, and I could be a tech. All joking aside. I appreciate the continued support of Atomic. Scott's professionalism and willingness to keep me in the loop is spot on. Thanks Scott.
Yes I do know what approximately the part is and how much but the problem is  almost all plumbers & even electricians want $100 service call.  That's ridiculous as if the part is $25 that $125 to me and that's too much but I see they want the $$$$ so they start with a service call. Example my outdoor light bulb broke and I couldn't get it out of socket.  I had to call electrician.  Yes, $100 service call, handed me the bulb and I gave him a new one to put it and that was it. Took him all of 10 min.  So now I hesitate when I need something done in these fields and thank goodness so far I'm not in need of anything..
Disclaimer: Plumbers Today is a free service that connects users with plumbers in their area. All contractors are independent and are in no way affiliated with Plumbers Today. Plumbers Today can neither endorse nor guarantee the quality of any work performed. It is the responsibility of each user to vet the contractor that he or she hires, and to confirm that the contractor meets all licensing and insurance requirements in that jurisdiction.
It only seems right to put cleaning supplies, like sponges, rags and liquids, under the sink, but plumbers say NO to this. Besides just being in the way, they can cause trap leaks. Drain traps, which are the curved pipes under the sink, are meant to keep sewer gases from entering your home, while also allowing waste water to pass. Blocking them off with clutter ups the risk of your cleaning products and trash can bumping into the pipes and dislodging them. Don’t feel bad if you’ve made a plumping mistake. Here are 36 almost unbelievable plumbing and electrical goofs.
Whatever your preference and price point, there’s a tub to sooth. That’s, of course, if you want a bathtub. Many homeowners — particularly those who don’t have young children living with them — have thrown the tub out with the bath water in favor of installing a walk-in shower. Just make sure to consider the pros and cons of tub to shower conversions.

“Intelligent Service replaced our two sump pumps, added digital float switches, and installed a digital wall unit to track the water levels and pump options. They also checked our existing battery backup for battery outputs. They improved the piping and fixed the check valves. They cleaned the sump pit and the work area. They did a terrific job. Will definitely use them again and will recommend them as well. Pleasure to work with, very responsive, knowledgeable staff, and did a good job explaining the work order prior to writing up the estimate.”


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Plumbing—from fixtures to vent pipes—in high-rise buildings and skyscrapers duplicated that used in other structures, but with the addition of several unique features. As gravity-fed city mains generally lift water no more than five or six stories, electrically operated pumps raise it to elevated storage tanks beyond that point. Water levels in the tanks are maintained automatically. Water is supplied from them throughout the structure by gravity, air pressure, or booster pumps. Likewise, gravity removes waste water by way of drainage pipes.


We provide a wide range of services from leaky faucets to water heater replacements and repairs. We proudly install American made Bradford-White brand water heaters. We service what we sell. That means should anything ever happen just give us a call. We can fix it for you. We also typically handle water heater replacements and repairs the same day. We frequently receive calls from customers who purchased water heaters from companies like Sears and Home Depot and are unable to get service on their water heater for 2 or 3 days.That is absurd! We understand your situation and promise to come out and help as soon as possible.
Plumbing originated during ancient civilizations such as the Greek, Roman, Persian, Indian, and Chinese cities as they developed public baths and needed to provide potable water and wastewater removal, for larger numbers of people.[6] Standardized earthen plumbing pipes with broad flanges making use of asphalt for preventing leakages appeared in the urban settlements of the Indus Valley Civilization by 2700 BC.[7] The Romans used lead pipe inscriptions to prevent water theft. The word "plumber" dates from the Roman Empire.[8] The Latin for lead is plumbum. Roman roofs used lead in conduits and drain pipes[9] and some were also covered with lead. Lead was also used for piping and for making baths.[10]
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