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Galvanized steel potable water supply and distribution pipes are commonly found with nominal pipe sizes from 3⁄8 inch (9.5 mm) to 2 inches (51 mm). It is rarely used today for new construction residential plumbing. Steel pipe has National Pipe Thread (NPT) standard tapered male threads, which connect with female tapered threads on elbows, tees, couplers, valves, and other fittings. Galvanized steel (often known simply as "galv" or "iron" in the plumbing trade) is relatively expensive, and difficult to work with due to weight and requirement of a pipe threader. It remains in common use for repair of existing "galv" systems and to satisfy building code non-combustibility requirements typically found in hotels, apartment buildings and other commercial applications. It is also extremely durable and resistant to mechanical abuse. Black lacquered steel pipe is the most widely used pipe material for fire sprinklers and natural gas.

Several types of pipe were used during the nineteenth century. With little or no knowledge of its possible long-term harmful effects, lead pipe was widely used. Its low price and the ease with which it could be formed and joined made it the material of choice for many installations. Iron, brass, and copper pipe were used as well. It was not unusual for a structure to be plumbed with several types of pipe, each used where it was most suited. But by the early twentieth century there was a move away from lead piping. The basic elements of domestic plumbing, in both the kitchen and bathroom, were in place by the 1890s. Changes since that time have been primarily aesthetic and in the materials used. During the second half of the twentieth century, tubs and basins that previously had been made of glazed ceramic or enameled iron, and much of the pipe manufactured in the United States as well, were being made of plastic.


I used Go Green Express Home Services for a minor plastic pipe repair under my kitchen sink...The worker did a great job fixing this minor pipe plastic pipe repair( my original pipe was too short and he needed to extended the pipe and then reconnect). It took him less than 10 minutes to fix. I was first quoted $125 +tax but when the worker went to his truck and spoke to whoever he spoke to at the office, the price rose to $155.10 +tax for a total of $167.10...I thought that was a little too high. Will I use this company again, I Don't Know. It would be helpful if they would have a set price list for jobs (minor repairs, Major repairs etc...), then you as the consumer can see beforehand what the cost maybe and work from there with the company. Minor repairs, Major repairs this company should at least have a set-price list. ..The worker was great and efficient and did a good job on the repair but their prices are a bit costly. And yes, I did write this in their review.

Home repairs and maintenance shouldn’t get pushed to the bottom of the to-do list. Unfortunately, most people don’t think they need plumbing repair services until there’s an emergency. While some plumbing issues may seem minor, they could actually be serious emergencies in the making. Routine repairs from Mr. Rooter® Plumbing are affordable, and they’ll save you from paying for emergency plumbing rescue in the future.

Honesty is important to all of our employees. One way that we stay honest with our customers is by providing straightforward, upfront pricing. While other plumbers in Phoenix, AZ may surprise you with hidden fees or unexpected add-ons, we never keep our pricing a secret from you. Our experienced technicians know what it takes to complete a job, and they’ll let you know the exact cost before they get started. If you have any questions or concerns, we’re more than happy to talk with you and answer all your questions. We also provide different financing options that can help make your next project be a little friendlier on your wallet. Just ask us about them.
 Ryan and Zach came quickly to my residence when the office scheduled them to come a day early to my pleasant surprise. They sharply dressed and very professional. They quickly diagnosed the kitchen faucet problem, brought the right tools to affect repairs and fixed the leak, I was impressed by their professionalism and teamwork. If I ever have another plumbing problem, Ryan and Zach performance convinced my to call Atomic next time. 

I was disappointed with the pressure of a tub and shower that were plumbed with 1/2 supply lines (2nd floor). Could be low pressure from the street, but I want to replace with 5/8. Plus, I'd like to have 2 back to back showers, one inside and one outside. So, I had intended to bring a 1 supply to both, then branch up to valves and shower head with 5/8. Finally, I thought pressure from the street was typically 55 to 70 psi and I am concerned if pvc can take that.Any thoughts?

Rooter Plumbing

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