Your water heater is an essential part of your home, heating water for showers, dishwashing, laundry and more. On average, a traditional water heater will last 8-12 years. The general consensus is that it’s better to replace your water heater with a new one than to repair one that’s 10 years old or more. Older models are less energy-efficient and thus more costly to run than newer models with better technology. Here are some indicators of when it may be time to replace an old water heater instead of repairing it:
Most large cities today pipe solid wastes to sewage treatment plants in order to separate and partially purify the water, before emptying into streams or other bodies of water. For potable water use, galvanized iron piping was commonplace in the United States from the late 1800s until around 1960. After that period, copper piping took over, first soft copper with flared fittings, then with rigid copper tubing utilizing soldered fittings.
We contacted Best Plumbing Service of Cincinnati to have the sump pump and the outlet pipes checked as our basement flooded recently and we were not sure whether the sump pump malfunctioned or the outlet pipe was blocked. Both plumbers did a fantastic job looking over the system, diagnosing, and fixing the problem. They were extremely honest, courteous , and professional. We are very pleased with their outstanding service and would very highly recommend Best Plumbing Service of Cincinnati. M Effat
As Americas neighborhood plumber, Roto-Rooter Plumbing and Drain Service is committed to providing high-quality services at an affordable price. With over 75 years of experience, we have the residential and commercial expertise to fix any plumbing problem or make any new installation. We are the premier provider of plumbing services throughout the Lakewood, CO, area and we can meet all of your local needs. Our plumber provides convenient service, 24 hours a day, 7 days a week so you never have to wait to get the help you need. Our 24 hour emergency services can tackle even the most complex plumbing problems.

I was disappointed with the pressure of a tub and shower that were plumbed with 1/2 supply lines (2nd floor). Could be low pressure from the street, but I want to replace with 5/8. Plus, I'd like to have 2 back to back showers, one inside and one outside. So, I had intended to bring a 1 supply to both, then branch up to valves and shower head with 5/8. Finally, I thought pressure from the street was typically 55 to 70 psi and I am concerned if pvc can take that.Any thoughts?

Rooter Plumbing

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