Hi Kenneth, We would be happy to get you connected with a pro for your project. You can submit a service request on our website: http://www.homeadvisor.com/, or browse reviews for local water heater pros here: http://www.homeadvisor.com/c.html. We can also have a project advisor reach out to assist you if you send your contact information to [email protected] –HASupport
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At Associated Plumbing, there is truly no task that’s too big or too small. If you have a leak, clogged drain or other plumbing concern, or if you need to have new fixtures installed or old ones repaired, we’re ready to help. Give us a call today at 813-991-7960 and learn why we are the preferred Tampa plumbing service provider for homes and businesses for more than a quarter century.
Not all plumbing companies can guarantee up-front pricing, superior workmanship and parts, licensed and insured plumbing contractors, and courteous support from uniformed professionals. Whether you are in need of drain cleaning or would like to schedule a plumbing inspection for your home, Mr. Rooter's plumbing services can handle it all! Our skilled plumbers are knowledgeable and equipped with the latest tools needed to achieve optimal results. Give us a call at (855) 982-2028, or request a job estimate online.
Our plumbers are licensed, bonded, and insured and meet our rigid trust certification standards. Our services are guaranteed in writing against defects in materials and workmanship. So if you need to repair, maintain, or improve your plumbing or septic system, you can rely on Parker & Sons. Our plumbing service includes a 100% money back guarantee and our customer care policies are unmatched in the industry.
“We had a toilet emergency one morning. After unsuccessful plunging efforts, we called Intelligent Service – and within 20 minutes, they were at our house. They found that the sewer line from our house to the street had snapped. Within 2 hours they had a permit and a backhoe in our front yard, and started work. By 5:00pm, we had water! They were extremely sympathetic to our situation. They were careful not to track snow and mud into the house. They cleaned up the area both inside and outside. Have already recommended the company to the many neighbors.”
Plumbing reached its early apex in ancient Rome, which saw the introduction of expansive systems of aqueducts, tile wastewater removal, and widespread use of lead pipes. With the Fall of Rome both water supply and sanitation stagnated—or regressed—for well over 1,000 years. Improvement was very slow, with little effective progress made until the growth of modern densely populated cities in the 1800s. During this period, public health authorities began pressing for better waste disposal systems to be installed, to prevent or control epidemics of disease. Earlier, the waste disposal system had merely consisted of collecting waste and dumping it on the ground or into a river. Eventually the development of separate, underground water and sewage systems eliminated open sewage ditches and cesspools.
The progress of a society may be judged by the way in which it disposes of its human waste material, and thus by the quality of its sewerage system (Mumford 1961, chap. 8). In the ancient world, the Greeks and Romans put great emphasis upon town planning. Roman cities were famed for their sewers, drains, aqueducts, paved streets, and roads. Domestic plumbing ranged from marble bathrooms with under-floor heating and indoor toilets in upmarket villas to basic latrine provision for the Roman army, as found, for example, alongside Hadrian’s Wall in northern Britain (Greed 2003). Following the decline of the Roman Empire, waste disposal returned to more primitive methods. Most ordinary people used an outdoor “privy,” while nobles often had an “indoor” toilet built out from the wall of their castle, hanging over the moat. In the Christian West during the Middle Ages, indoor plumbing, or for that matter personal hygiene and privacy, were not highly esteemed marks of civilization or progress, although washing and bathing, and bathhouses, were given higher priority in the Muslim East (Bonneville 1997).

Most large cities today pipe solid wastes to sewage treatment plants in order to separate and partially purify the water, before emptying into streams or other bodies of water. For potable water use, galvanized iron piping was commonplace in the United States from the late 1800s until around 1960. After that period, copper piping took over, first soft copper with flared fittings, then with rigid copper tubing utilizing soldered fittings.

We had a leak under the kitchen sink & called Atomic Plumbing. They sent someone over that same day. They sent an email appointment confirmation & kept us posted both via email & telephone on the status of our appointment & expected arrival of the plumber. Our plumber was Don Richards. He was very pleasant and professional. He used protective covering on his shoes & went over the cost of the repair. He fixed the leak in no time and did not leave a mess at all. Very impressive. Thanks for the outstanding service Atomic Plumbing!


James and Paul did an AWESOME job from start to finish with our toilet replacement and installation!! We unfortunately had a bad experience with our general contractor and his plumber and needed immediate assistance. I called Atomic and they immediately got me connected with a scheduler, then had James and Paul out to our house extremely fast! James and Paul were friendly, knowledgeable, professional, and efficient. They advised us based on their expertise and helped us pick out a new toilet and install it correctly. We are so grateful for their work and their professionalism. Would highly recommend them and hire them again!
We have used Atomic multiple times and every time they have done a phenomenal job! We've had 2 different plumbing specialist, both named Justin, and each have been wonderful and knowledgeable in helping us with our problems. Our most recent issue was a leaking service line. Atomic had Justin D. to my house at 7pm, and was able to schedule me for next day repairs! I will only use and recommend Atomic as my plumbing service!
Our goal in business is to treat all of our customers like friends; always treating them with respect, fairness, and honesty. We are a family owned and operated Connecticut plumbing company, and because of this all of our customers receive the attention that they deserve. Mike Marandino, the owner of the company, (as well as master plumber) works out on the road right alongside his employees. He or his wife handles all calls personally and it's the personal touch that makes us special. We strive for 100% satisfaction, and if for any reason a customer of ours isn't satisfied we promise we'll make it right.
Plastic pipe is in wide use for domestic water supply and drain-waste-vent (DWV) pipe. Principal types include: Polyvinyl chloride (PVC) was produced experimentally in the 19th century but did not become practical to manufacture until 1926, when Waldo Semon of BF Goodrich Co. developed a method to plasticize PVC, making it easier to process. PVC pipe began to be manufactured in the 1940s and was in wide use for Drain-Waste-Vent piping during the reconstruction of Germany and Japan following WWII. In the 1950s, plastics manufacturers in Western Europe and Japan began producing acrylonitrile butadiene styrene (ABS) pipe. The method for producing cross-linked polyethylene (PEX) was also developed in the 1950s. Plastic supply pipes have become increasingly common, with a variety of materials and fittings employed.
Water systems of ancient times relied on gravity for the supply of water, using pipes or channels usually made of clay, lead, bamboo, wood, or stone. Hollowed wooden logs wrapped in steel banding were used for plumbing pipes, particularly water mains. Logs were used for water distribution in England close to 500 years ago. US cities began using hollowed logs in the late 1700s through the 1800s. Today, most plumbing supply pipe is made out of steel, copper, and plastic; most waste (also known as "soil")[21] out of steel, copper, plastic, and cast iron.[21]
M and M, Heating & Cooling, Plumbing & Electrical offers swift, reliable plumbing and rooter services throughout Longmont, CO & surrounding areas. Our fully licensed and insured team of qualified plumbing professionals ensure efficient, dependable, and long-term performance from your plumbing system.  From water heater installation and repair, to drain cleaning and clog removal, there is no challenge we can’t resolve to your complete satisfaction.  Providing convenient and prompt scheduling, accurate diagnosis of any plumbing-related difficulties, and tidy job sites, we alleviate stress, mess, and aggravation, and deliver rewarding results.

For details about apprenticeship or other opportunities in this occupation, contact the offices of the state employment service; the state apprenticeship agency; local plumbing, heating, and cooling contractors or firms that employ fitters; or local union–management apprenticeship committees. Apprenticeship information is available from the U.S. Department of Labor's Apprenticeship program online, or by phone at 877-872-5627.


Cast iron and ductile iron pipe was long a lower-cost alternative to copper, before the advent of durable plastic materials but special non-conductive fittings must be used where transitions are to be made to other metallic pipes, except for terminal fittings, in order to avoid corrosion owing to electrochemical reactions between dissimilar metals (see galvanic cell).[17]
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