I am not a plumber, but I am familiar with oxidation.  Many simple plumbing valves only need to be removed and new "O" rings installed.  That's where the problem comes in.  Most older homes used metal pipes and not PVC.  Usually the valve screws into a different type of metal and oxidation occurs between the two metals, almost becoming one.  In order to get the valve stem out you have to break it loose.  If you break the pipe, not only do you have a mess but then you have to pay to fix it.  Simple if you break it you pay.  If a plumber breaks it, he is responsible.  I recommend paying the plumbers fee and save yourselves headaches in the long run. 
I needed a neutral place to research plumbing jobs: had the suspicion I was being 'led down a garden path' because I knew nothing - other than how expensive it was and how urgent  'do it NOW!" it was. I appreciate the cost estimate and national average pages which confirmed my suspicions.  I found another plumber through this site and hope for better, less panic, less cost service from now on. Thanks.
I have no problem paying for any service I receive but when Allied Reddi-Rooter came into my home and immediately tell me and them tell me it would cost me 350.00 for them to install a new Rheem water heater (his recommendation) that cost 409.00 I have a problem. If the cost is exactly how Home Advisor indicates then he’s charging 350.00an hour.  I did my homework checked with other plumbers and it. Would not take an hour to remove old and install the new water heater. Thank Goodness I did my research won’t be using their services and I will be letting others know what happen to me. Shame on you Allied
 CON'T FROM COMMENTS EARLIER.  However,  the  installation took less than 3/4/ hour and was a basic regulator with no other function.  Looking up the price afterwards, invoice did not list type or price, it appears that it would have cost me around $60 for the regulator and another $15 or so for the additional supplies necessary to install it and it was really a rather simple job with easy access.    Given that, it seems that $300 for less that  an hours worth of on site work,  company says it does not include commute time in its prices, is a little high.  While flat rate quotes are nice, they must take into consideration situations where the work load differs depending on the circumstances.  Therefore, unless you are at the upper end of the harder work needed than the average job. it can be argued that my estimated price of $300 for labor was more than a little high.  Maybe I am wrong since I have not used their services for years and  am not knowledgeable of the costs of equipment and professional labor today.   

Len The Plumber is a full service plumbing and drain cleaning company serving the entire Baltimore, Washington D.C., Northern Virginia, Delaware and the Philadelphia Area as well as Anne Arundel, Baltimore, Carroll, Cecil, Harford, Howard, Montgomery, Prince George’s, Charles, Fairfax, Alexandria, Arlington, Loudoun, Prince William, Falls Church, Manassas, Delaware, Chester, New Castle, and Stafford counties. We are continuing to grow and expand our service areas so please continue to check-in to see if we are in your area and always feel free to call if you have a question. Our service area map shows all the counties and district that we currently serve.
Need a quick fix? After having a plumber come out to your house, they might tell you the part needed to fix your toilet or sink issue is going to take a week. Don’t be too amenable if you can’t wait. There’s no shame in working with another plumber who can get the part and do the job when you need it. If you’re doing the job yourself, be sure you know these tips for completing a plumbing fix like a pro.
The conventional water heater in your home has an important role. Making and keeping water hot. Advances in technology have allowed for more energy-efficient, electric, tank water heaters, as well as the creation of tankless water heaters that can produce a seemingly endless supply of hot water. The power sources include gas, propane, oil, and of course electricity. The newer water heater styles include solar and hybrid heat pumps.
Heaney Plumbing & Heating relies on the most advanced diagnostic tools to assess your pipes. Through camera line inspection, sewer video inspection and other methods, not only can we tell if a plumbing repair or upgrade is warranted, but we can quickly determine where and how to perform it. With our help, your home or business will never be vulnerable to unseen decay.
When you’re searching for a dependable Dallas plumber or Dallas plumbing company “near me” which offers licensed and trained plumbers for any plumbing repair or plumbing installation like water heaters, tankless heaters, garbage disposals, drain or sewer lines, water filtration, water softening or other plumbing needs, call 214-892-2225214-892-2225.

Heaney Plumbing & Heating relies on the most advanced diagnostic tools to assess your pipes. Through camera line inspection, sewer video inspection and other methods, not only can we tell if a plumbing repair or upgrade is warranted, but we can quickly determine where and how to perform it. With our help, your home or business will never be vulnerable to unseen decay.

For many centuries, lead was the favoured material for water pipes, because its malleability made it practical to work into the desired shape. (Such use was so common that the word "plumbing" derives from plumbum, the Latin word for lead.) This was a source of lead-related health problems in the years before the health hazards of ingesting lead were fully understood; among these were stillbirths and high rates of infant mortality. Lead water pipes were still widely used in the early 20th century, and remain in many households. In addition, lead-tin alloy solder was commonly used to join copper pipes, but modern practice uses tin-antimony alloy solder instead, in order to eliminate lead hazards.[13]


Each Government at the state level has their own Authority and regulations in place for licensing plumbers. They are also responsible for the interpretation, administration and enforcement of the regulations outlined in the NCC.[38] These Authorities are usually established for the sole purpose of regulating plumbing activities in their respective states/territories. However, several state level regulation acts are quite outdated, with some still operating on local policies introduced more than a decade ago. This has led to an increase in plumbing regulatory issues not covered under current policy, and as such, many policies are currently being updated to cover these more modern issues. The updates include changed to the minimum experience and training requirements for licensing, additional work standards for new and more specific kinds of plumbing, as well as adopting the Plumbing Code of Australia into state regulations in an effort to standardise plumbing regulations across the country.[39]
The introduction of the first water-retaining traps or seals in the 1850s, and the common use of "U"-shaped traps in the 1870s, were major steps forward. The design of the trap ensured that enough water remained in it to effectively block the passage of sewer gas back through the plumbing fixtures. During the 1870s vent pipes were introduced. They not only carried sewer gas out of the system, but also broke the suction created by movement of liquid in the pipes and eliminated the possibility of siphoning water that sealed the traps.

Where plumbing had been a mostly locally regulated matter for most of its history, the federal government became involved in the early 1990s. Until the 1950s, toilets generally used five or more gallons per flush (GPF). During the decades that followed, the plumbing industry reduced the standard volume for toilet flush tanks to 3.5 gallons. A further reduction in volume resulted from the Energy Policy Act of 1992, which in the name of conservation mandated that all new toilets made in the United States must use no more than 1.6 GPF. The same legislation also regulated the flow in shower heads and faucets. Although the first low-flow toilets proved un-satisfactory and were met with public disapproval, redesigned equipment employing new technology has removed most objections.

As Americas neighborhood plumber, Roto-Rooter Plumbing and Drain Service is committed to providing high-quality services at an affordable price. With over 75 years of experience, we have the residential and commercial expertise to fix any plumbing problem or make any new installation. We are the premier provider of plumbing services throughout the Lakewood, CO, area and we can meet all of your local needs. Our plumber provides convenient service, 24 hours a day, 7 days a week so you never have to wait to get the help you need. Our 24 hour emergency services can tackle even the most complex plumbing problems.
Plumbing originated during ancient civilizations such as the Greek, Roman, Persian, Indian, and Chinese cities as they developed public baths and needed to provide potable water and wastewater removal, for larger numbers of people.[6] Standardized earthen plumbing pipes with broad flanges making use of asphalt for preventing leakages appeared in the urban settlements of the Indus Valley Civilization by 2700 BC.[7] The Romans used lead pipe inscriptions to prevent water theft. The word "plumber" dates from the Roman Empire.[8] The Latin for lead is plumbum. Roman roofs used lead in conduits and drain pipes[9] and some were also covered with lead. Lead was also used for piping and for making baths.[10]
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