“Don’t go to the Yellow Pages to find a plumber,” says Berkey’s Bill Stevens. “It’s like guessing lottery numbers. Anyone can make an appealing ad, but that doesn’t mean they are legitimate. In this industry, it’s easy for a plumber who develops a poor reputation to advertise under a different name. They come and go.” Even searching for someone online may end up being a scam using fake reviews. Instead, look for a plumber who is well-established in your community. Check the Better Business Bureau and read customer reviews at sites such as HomeAdvisor, Angie’s List, or Citysearch. Local contractors or plumbing fixture stores can also refer you to a quality plumber, according to Grady Daniel, who owns a plumbing company in Austin, Texas. “Most of these firms won’t work with bad plumbers.” Or simply ask your neighbors for a referral. A trusted plumber that consistently delivers quality service does not remain a secret for very long.

Galvanized steel potable water supply and distribution pipes are commonly found with nominal pipe sizes from 3⁄8 inch (9.5 mm) to 2 inches (51 mm). It is rarely used today for new construction residential plumbing. Steel pipe has National Pipe Thread (NPT) standard tapered male threads, which connect with female tapered threads on elbows, tees, couplers, valves, and other fittings. Galvanized steel (often known simply as "galv" or "iron" in the plumbing trade) is relatively expensive, and difficult to work with due to weight and requirement of a pipe threader. It remains in common use for repair of existing "galv" systems and to satisfy building code non-combustibility requirements typically found in hotels, apartment buildings and other commercial applications. It is also extremely durable and resistant to mechanical abuse. Black lacquered steel pipe is the most widely used pipe material for fire sprinklers and natural gas.
Do you think you have a water leak in your house or business in Phoenix, San Diego and the Inland Empire? Does your floor feel hot? Have you noticed an unexpected increase in your Phoenix, San Diego and the Inland Empire water or gas bill? Our plumbers in Phoenix, San Diego and the Inland Empire are experts in the latest electronic leak detection technology.
Estimating a plumbing job is best left to the professionals. However, our guides linked to throughout this article are the best first step to understanding pricing. Understanding basic plumbing is an excellent second step. Not only does this help you diagnose potential problems before they become costly ones, but it’ll help you understand what a plumber does.
Present-day water-supply systems use a network of high-pressure pumps, and pipes in buildings are now made of copper,[25] brass, plastic (particularly cross-linked polyethylene called PEX, which is estimated to be used in 60% of single-family homes[26]), or other nontoxic material. Due to its toxicity, most cities moved away from lead water-supply piping by the 1920s in the United States,[27] although lead pipes were approved by national plumbing codes into the 1980s,[28] and lead was used in plumbing solder for drinking water until it was banned in 1986.[27] Drain and vent lines are made of plastic, steel, cast-iron, or lead.[29][30]

A conventional water heater is recognized as a cylindrical storage tank ranging in size from 20 to 80 gallons in capacity. This tank is typically insulated with one or two elements that heat the water to the temperature set on the thermostat. Conventional water heaters have been used for decades in residential and commercial buildings. However, this method of constantly heating or keeping the tank of water hot is not very energy efficient, especially if you don’t have a need for hot water 24 hours a day.
Because each style has its own formatting nuances that evolve over time and not all information is available for every reference entry or article, Encyclopedia.com cannot guarantee each citation it generates. Therefore, it’s best to use Encyclopedia.com citations as a starting point before checking the style against your school or publication’s requirements and the most-recent information available at these sites:

The word "plumber" dates from the Roman Empire.[3] The Latin for lead is plumbum. Roman roofs used lead in conduits and drain pipes[4] and some were also covered with lead, lead was also used for piping and for making baths.[5] In medieval times anyone who worked with lead was referred to as a plumber as can be seen from an extract of workmen fixing a roof in Westminster Palace and were referred to as plumbers "To Gilbert de Westminster, plumber, working about the roof of the pantry of the little hall, covering it with lead, and about various defects in the roof of the little hall".[6] Thus a person with expertise in working with lead was first known as a Plumbarius which was later shortened to plumber.
Scott was very knowledgeable and happy to test out all items of my finikie hot water heater. He called in tech support and tested pressures and did a vent pipe test to check air flow. How do I know this, because he explained everything to me. One afternoon with him, and I could be a tech. All joking aside. I appreciate the continued support of Atomic. Scott's professionalism and willingness to keep me in the loop is spot on. Thanks Scott.
Several of the nation's larger cities were providing water to their residents during the first decade of the nineteenth century, but only infrequently was water actually brought into homes. City-provided water was used in large part to fight fires and flush streets. Household water was most likely taken from a tap located outside of the house or a common hydrant. For those not connected to city mains, and even some who were, there were still other ways to obtain water. If a stream was not near by, there was rain runoff from a roof. It could be collected in one or more tanks located in out-of-the-way places in a house and feed the plumbing system through gravity.
Both public and domestic toilet design is becoming increasingly technologically driven, with automatic flushes and sensor-controlled washing-and-drying facilities becoming commonplace. In parallel, environmental sustainability requirements to save water have resulted in a range of dual-flush cisterns, waterless urinals, and human-waste recycling innovations. High levels of toilet provision in every home, along with highly developed sewerage systems, are no longer necessarily seen as signs of progress and economic development. Such assumptions are now being questioned. Many parts of the world are not economically or environmentally in a position to build modern, expensive water and sewerage systems: It is not a high priority. Water is becoming an increasingly expensive and scarce resource; some see it as “the new oil” in terms of future geopolitical tensions. Far from being a sign of economic development, many see the emphasis upon water-based sewerage systems and flushing toilets as old fashioned, colonial, and unsustainable. Instead, new, more sustainable solutions are being developed, especially within prosperous advanced Asian countries that can afford such research. Such systems will incorporate the most modern technological and scientific advances in the fields of engineering, pathogen control, and urban governance (Chun 2002; Mara 2006).
The thicknesses of the water pipe and tube walls can vary. Pipe wall thickness is denoted by various schedules or for large bore polyethylene pipe in the UK by the Standard Dimension Ratio (SDR), defined as the ratio of the pipe diameter to its wall thickness. Pipe wall thickness increases with schedule, and is available in schedules 20, 40, 80, and higher in special cases. The schedule is largely determined by the operating pressure of the system, with higher pressures commanding greater thickness. Copper tubing is available in four wall thicknesses: type DWV (thinnest wall; only allowed as drain pipe per UPC), type 'M' (thin; typically only allowed as drain pipe by IPC code), type 'L' (thicker, standard duty for water lines and water service), and type 'K' (thickest, typically used underground between the main and the meter). Because piping and tubing are commodities, having a greater wall thickness implies higher initial cost. Thicker walled pipe generally implies greater durability and higher pressure tolerances.
While in the past, mains drainage and indoor plumbing were a sign of modernity, today people want “designer” bathrooms, luxury fixtures, power showers, fitted kitchens, and the latest technology. There has been a “restroom revolution” in Asia in particular, with companies such as Toto producing complete prefabricated bathroom units for the Japanese housing market, all the components being made together. Colored polyester resins, modern plastics, and marble and granite composites feature strongly in these modern bathroom modules (Greed 2003). Likewise, modern automatic public toilets are fully integrated, prefabricated systems that often use stainless steel and pathogen-resistant polymer materials. However, user-end toilet innovation must be matched by provider-end infrastructural sewerage system provision. The functionality of domestic toilets is dependent on there being a working sewerage system to take away output. Alternatively, the output from a luxury bathroom, as is the case in some affluent areas in developing countries, might end up in a cesspool under the house for collection by traditional night-soil operatives. Alternatively, as in some parts of the Americas and Australasia, even upmarket private houses are not served by a municipal sewerage and drainage system, and depend upon their own cesspits, generators, and water tanks.
Justin D and Eric worked on four leaky spots in one afternoon replacing toilet parts, bathroom sink fixtures, shower fixtures and an ancient outdoor spigot that required going into the crawl space. All were done efficiently and with detailed explanations. Additionally, each work area was left completely cleaned up. I appreciate that they also alerted me to a duct work problem under the house which I may not have discovered for some time. My parents, also customers, and I are happy to give a big thumbs up to Atomic Plumbing. Thank you Justin D and Eric! Good team!

“Intelligent Service replaced our two sump pumps, added digital float switches, and installed a digital wall unit to track the water levels and pump options. They also checked our existing battery backup for battery outputs. They improved the piping and fixed the check valves. They cleaned the sump pit and the work area. They did a terrific job. Will definitely use them again and will recommend them as well. Pleasure to work with, very responsive, knowledgeable staff, and did a good job explaining the work order prior to writing up the estimate.”

Outstanding, friendly, reasonably priced, and professional work! Atomic Plumbing provided excellent service from the timely response, to my call to updates prior to their arrival time, to the actual work conducted on site. They provided me with options and didn't try and strong arm us into service we didn't need. They stayed with us until we could verify the service was complete (and the toilet didn't back up again) and ensured we had peace of mind about the work that was done before they left. I asked for additional service to be completed on the upstairs bathroom shower and the technician, James M., provided an initial assessment for free and gave me options. Once I determined it was going to need his expertise, he quickly and efficiently got to work and fixed that problem too. They were military friendly and provided me a 10% discount which for a family of five on a single income, every little bit helps! I would STRONGLY recommend Atomic over the other guys any day of the week! Thank you Atomic! -Nick R.


Mounted under the sink, the garbage disposal is meant for chopping up small bits of waste food.  When switched on the motor spins and impellers — also called lugs — throw bits of food against a grinder ring. You should always run water while using the garbage disposal; once the garbage disposal does its job, the water flushes the finely chopped particles down the drain.
Whether you're unclogging drains with your handy drain snake, installing a sprinkler system or solving drainage problems, Lowe's has everything you need to make your plumbing project a success. From toilets, toilet repair, water heaters and filtration systems to faucets, metal pipes and fittings or plastic pipes and fittings, we're here to help. We’ll help make sure that pipe dreams aren’t as impossible as they seem with the right PVC pipe, PVC pipe fittings, PEX pipe and fittings and pipe connectors. We’ve got everything you need to get your water where you need it with our selection of septic tanks, water pumps, submersible pumps and irrigation pumps. And we also carry sump pump check valves to make sure that discharge water doesn’t flow back into your sump system. Check out our how-to articles and videos for step-by-step guides on do-it-yourself tasks. Get started on transforming your home into a safe, energy-efficient spot for the whole family.
Scott was very knowledgeable and happy to test out all items of my finikie hot water heater. He called in tech support and tested pressures and did a vent pipe test to check air flow. How do I know this, because he explained everything to me. One afternoon with him, and I could be a tech. All joking aside. I appreciate the continued support of Atomic. Scott's professionalism and willingness to keep me in the loop is spot on. Thanks Scott.
Plumbing is one of those things you don't give much thought to, until it fails. We understand that. We also understand just how fast plumbing shoots to the top of your list of important things when there's a problem. But that's the beauty of Plumbers Today. We love plumbing, and we think about all your residential plumbing needs year-round so you don't have to.
Using corrosive chemicals to dissolve a clog is like throwing a grenade down a gopher hole. Instead, Wroblewski recommends flushing your drains weekly with a half cup of baking soda and one cup of vinegar. Let it fizz in the drain for ten minutes, then pour in four cups of boiling water. Find out about the plumbing nightmares that will make you cringe.
When you are faced with a plumbing emergency, time is of the essence. You don’t want to have to spend time searching for a plumber near you that is open nights, weekends, and holidays that won’t charge you exorbitant fees for immediate availability to address plumbing emergencies. Roto-Rooter plumbers offer a variety of emergency plumbing services around the clock at an affordable price, so you can get the plumbing services you need at a price that won’t break the budget.
Average Americans work well into their 60s, so workers might as well have a job that’s enjoyable and a career that's fulfilling. A job with a low stress level, good work-life balance and solid prospects to improve, get promoted and earn a higher salary would make many employees happy. Here's how Plumbers job satisfaction is rated in terms of upward mobility, stress level and flexibility. Click Here
×