Both public and domestic toilet design is becoming increasingly technologically driven, with automatic flushes and sensor-controlled washing-and-drying facilities becoming commonplace. In parallel, environmental sustainability requirements to save water have resulted in a range of dual-flush cisterns, waterless urinals, and human-waste recycling innovations. High levels of toilet provision in every home, along with highly developed sewerage systems, are no longer necessarily seen as signs of progress and economic development. Such assumptions are now being questioned. Many parts of the world are not economically or environmentally in a position to build modern, expensive water and sewerage systems: It is not a high priority. Water is becoming an increasingly expensive and scarce resource; some see it as “the new oil” in terms of future geopolitical tensions. Far from being a sign of economic development, many see the emphasis upon water-based sewerage systems and flushing toilets as old fashioned, colonial, and unsustainable. Instead, new, more sustainable solutions are being developed, especially within prosperous advanced Asian countries that can afford such research. Such systems will incorporate the most modern technological and scientific advances in the fields of engineering, pathogen control, and urban governance (Chun 2002; Mara 2006).

James and Paul did an AWESOME job from start to finish with our toilet replacement and installation!! We unfortunately had a bad experience with our general contractor and his plumber and needed immediate assistance. I called Atomic and they immediately got me connected with a scheduler, then had James and Paul out to our house extremely fast! James and Paul were friendly, knowledgeable, professional, and efficient. They advised us based on their expertise and helped us pick out a new toilet and install it correctly. We are so grateful for their work and their professionalism. Would highly recommend them and hire them again!
Roto-Rooter plumbers in Lakewood provide full service plumbing maintenance and repairs and clogged drain cleaning, 24 hours a day, including toilet repairs. Roto-Rooters Lakewood plumbers offer residential and commercial plumbing services that customers depend on for all of their local plumbing needs. Trusted and recommended since 1935, Roto-Rooter is the premier provider of plumbing and drain cleaning services in Lakewood, CO. Homeowners and businesses depend on Roto-Rooter 24 hours a day, 7 days a week. Our specialty is emergency services. We stand by our estimates and guarantee our work. Your call will be answered by a trained customer service representative who will handle your request quickly and schedule service at your convenience.
plumbers must be asked directly what they charge hourly and if that is in addition to a service charge. The two are separate and I think they have gotten away with outrageous charges because of the potential of water damaging homeowner structures.   I had a plumber (not Home advisor) come and replace a part in my kitchen sink that was under warranty---the spray nozzle had been leaking...He charged me $85.00 for 15 minutes of work and I will never use Mr King again. 
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Apprentice plumber: Apprenticeship programs generally provide the most comprehensive training for novice plumbers. Either union locals and their affiliated companies or nonunion contractor organizations can administer this training. Apprenticeships typically consist of at least three to four years of paid, on-the-job training and some hours of related classroom instruction.
plumbing, piping systems inside buildings for water supply and sewage. The Romans had a highly developed plumbing system; water was brought to Rome by aqueducts and distributed to homes in lead pipes—hence the name plumbing from the Latin word plumbum for lead. During the Middle Ages, however, plumbing became almost nonexistent. In fact, London's first water system after the Middle Ages (c.1515) consisted partly of the rehabilitated Roman system; the rest was patterned after it. Modern plumbing began in the early 1800s, when steam engines became capable of supplying water under pressure and cheap cast iron pipes could be supplied to carry it. The common materials used today in water supply pipes are steel, copper, brass, plastic, and lead. Plumbing for sewage is made of cast iron, steel, asbestos cement, copper, and plastic. Water pressure is usually insufficient to supply the needs of tall apartment and office buildings; in such cases storage tanks are installed on the roof, into which a pump lifts water. The water then flows through the piping system of the building by gravity. Smaller buildings may have a pneumatic tank for the same purpose. The tank is partly filled with air, which is compressed when water is pumped in so that it will force water through the pipes. Sewage and drain systems typically have a trap, often a loop-shaped section of pipe, to seal off vapors in the pipes from the rest of the building. Vent pipes lead these vapors to the outside of the building; they also eliminate any suction in the piping and thus prevent the siphoning of water from traps when a nearby fixture discharges. In the 1970s and 80s flexible polybutylene plumbing was widely installed in standard and mobile homes. When unprecedented numbers of these plastic pipes began leaking because of exposure to chlorine and other chemicals in tap water, homeowners brought class-action lawsuits against the manufacturers, which were settled in 1995 for hundreds of millions of dollars.
In urban areas, the emptying of chamber pots straight into the street, and the accumulation of piles of human waste, resulted in disease and an unpleasant urban environment. Night-soil men were often employed to collect excreta, which was spread on the fields as fertilizer. Although Sir John Harrington had developed an indoor flushing toilet for Queen Elizabeth I in 1596, it was not until the rise of mass industrialization and urbanization in the nineteenth century that domestic toilets were mass-produced in northern England. Flushing technology was improved through the efforts of inventive manufacturers such as John Shanks, George Jennings, Alexander Cummings, and Thomas Crapper in the United Kingdom (Reyburn 1969) and Thomas Maddocks, John Randall Mann, William Campbell, and Henry Demarest, among others, in the United States (Palmer 1973). Early toilet manufacturers were generally companies that had first made their name in the manufacture of china and earthenware. Such English companies as Minton, Twyford, and Doulton adapted their production processes to make porcelain toilet bowls and pans. Toilet design was based upon the “sit” rather than “squat” mode of excretion (which required nothing more than a hole in the ground). The sit approach required a specific and highly marketable consumer product, the “pedestal” toilet, along with all the plumbing fixtures, such as taps (faucets), cisterns, basins, and fittings that together made up the “bathroom.” Interestingly, urinals for men, although a common feature of public toilets, are not generally a feature of private domestic bathrooms. These artifacts were exported from Britain to the rest of the world as a sign of modernity and Western progress, and were rapidly adopted for fear of being seen as “backward” or “dirty,” in spite of the fact that the majority of the world’s population squats when eliminating waste, a position that is ergonomically more healthy and efficient.
"Michael completed an emergency repair for us on a Sunday night-- I wasn't having any luck finding plumbers that could handle an emergency repair. We had a constant stream of water coming out of our main water valve shut off in the house. We couldn't find the outside turn off valve- so we were in trouble. He came out right away, showed us how to turn off the main line into the house (we could find the box, but not the valve to turn off) and then repaired the inside valve. Costs were very reasonable for a Sunday night emergency call. We'll be installing a tankless water heater soon and he will get our business! Highly recommend!!"
Honesty is important to all of our employees. One way that we stay honest with our customers is by providing straightforward, upfront pricing. While other plumbers in Phoenix, AZ may surprise you with hidden fees or unexpected add-ons, we never keep our pricing a secret from you. Our experienced technicians know what it takes to complete a job, and they’ll let you know the exact cost before they get started. If you have any questions or concerns, we’re more than happy to talk with you and answer all your questions. We also provide different financing options that can help make your next project be a little friendlier on your wallet. Just ask us about them.
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