If you have a leaking faucet in your home, it could be costing you hundreds of dollars a year on your water bills. A faulty tap can also lead to the growth of unhealthy mold and mildew. One of our expert technicians can quickly and efficiently take care of repairing or replacing that leaking faucet. We can also take care of installing or repairing any of the other plumbing fixtures in your home, including sinks toilets and showers.
Those who attempted to bring plumbing indoors faced technical as well as attitudinal challenges. Decisions on how wastewater was removed required as much concern as those made to ensure an adequate water supply. But equally vexing was the prevailing miasma theory of disease, which held that illnesses stemmed from "bad air" that was readily identifiable by its offensive odor. This led to a distrust of early indoor plumbing that tended to leak and a deadly fear of the sewer gas that accompanied the leaks. It is no wonder then that many individuals maintained a strong belief that elimination was best taken care of out of doors.
Sometimes, homeowners are not sure whether they should call a local plumber immediately or wait a while longer for repairs. But remember that no matter how small the problem is, it can escalate into something much worse as time goes on. We recommended contacting our team immediately when you notice any performance issues with your system, including leaking or clogs, so that we can get out there ASAP. You can also schedule an appointment with us to add on important plumbing features, like a water softener or an automatic shut off valve.
You'll want to make sure that whoever is working on your plumbing understands current building codes and has expert plumbing knowledge. Ask to see their trade license number as well as their registered business number. Asking to verify the dollar amounts of their bonding and insurance is also standard practice. Bonding and insurance helps protect you as the homeowner from accidents, injury, damage to property or unpaid work.

I was disappointed with the pressure of a tub and shower that were plumbed with 1/2 supply lines (2nd floor). Could be low pressure from the street, but I want to replace with 5/8. Plus, I'd like to have 2 back to back showers, one inside and one outside. So, I had intended to bring a 1 supply to both, then branch up to valves and shower head with 5/8. Finally, I thought pressure from the street was typically 55 to 70 psi and I am concerned if pvc can take that.Any thoughts?

Rooter Plumbing

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